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Saturday, February 26, 2011

SPOIL by EP Films plus

Website of the Weekend

SPOIL
by EP Films plus

http://vimeo.com/19582018

Still Waters, The Global Fish Crisis

Global Fisheries Crisis

Shark Net

Still Waters, The Global Fish Crisis

The Mediterranean may lose its wild bluefin tuna. High-tech harvesting and wasteful management have brought world fish stocks to dangerous lows. This story explores the fish crisis—as well as the hope for a new relationship between man and the sea.

By Fen Montaigne
Photograph by Brian Skerry
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Little Fish Exploding in Number, Models Show

Sailfish hunt sardines using their bills and sails to corner the fish.
Sailfish hunt sardines, one of the prey species that models suggest are expanding in number.
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The End of the Line: how a film changed the way we eat fish

The End of the Line: how a film changed the way we eat fish

Tom Levitt and Ali Thomas
18th February, 2011
Bycatch Report highlights the lasting impact of The End of the Line in raising awareness of unsustainable fishing practices - and illustrates how radical new film funding models can work more...
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Friday, February 25, 2011

The 9 billion-people question

The 9 billion-people question

The world’s population will grow from almost 7 billion now to over 9 billion in 2050. John Parker asks if there will be enough food to go round

USDA Approved Monsanto Alfalfa Despite Warnings of New Pathogen Discovered in Genetically Engineered Crops

USDA Approved Monsanto Alfalfa Despite Warnings of New Pathogen Discovered in Genetically Engineered Crops
Mike Ludwig, Truthout: "Just two weeks before the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) fully deregulated Monsanto's Roundup Ready alfalfa, a senior soil scientist alerted the department about a newly discovered, microscopic pathogen found in high concentrations of Roundup Ready corn and soy that researchers believe could be causing infertility in livestock and diseases in crops that could threaten the entire domestic food supply."
Read the Article
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Drought rattles farmers in eastern China

Drought rattles farmers in eastern China

February 25, 2011 by Boris Cambreleng
The Chinese government has allocated 13 billion yuan to combat a widespread drought in the east of the countryEnlarge

Villagers are seen carrying bottled drinking water in a drought-blighted region of China. A widespread record drought in the east of the country is threatening to send global food prices even higher as China's key wheat crop falters.
Yu Ruicheng's weathered face creases with worry as she stands on her dry wheat field in eastern China, where a record drought is threatening to send soaring global food prices even higher.

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The rise in sea level of the Mediterranean is accelerating

Mediterranean Sea surfaceImage via Wikipedia

The rise in sea level of the Mediterranean is accelerating

February 25, 2011
The rise in sea level of the Mediterranean is acceleratingEnlarge

In this image, scientists are collecting samples during the RADMED campaign. Credit: IEO
At the end of the 20th century, the rise in sea level of the Mediterranean sea was lower than in the rest of the world due to atmospheric pressure, but since the start of the 21st century the levels of the Mediterranean have regained pace and seem to be accelerating. This has been demonstrated by the updated results from the second edition of the book Cambio Climático en el Mediterráneo Español (Climate Change in the Spanish Mediterranean).

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Letter to Vilsack About Dangers of Roundup Leaked

Letter to Vilsack About Dangers of Roundup Leaked

Pathogen in Roundup Ready Soy and Corn Could Lead to Calamity, Scientist Warns

Pathogen in Roundup Ready Soy and Corn Could Lead to Calamity, Scientist Warns


Rare, unique seeds arrive at Svalbard Vault, as crises threaten world crop collections

Rare, unique seeds arrive at Svalbard Vault, as crises threaten world crop collections

The Svalbard Global Seed Vault (SGSV) celebrated its third anniversary today with the arrival of seeds for rare lima beans, blight-resistant cantaloupe, and progenitors of antioxidant-rich red tomatoes from Peru and the Galapagos Islands. The arrival of these collections, including many drought- and flood-resistant varieties, comes at a time when natural and man-made risks to agriculture have reinforced the critical need to secure all the world's food crop varieties.
 
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Thursday, February 24, 2011

California water future called 'bleak'



disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only

Sacramento (UPI) Feb 24, 2011 Scientists say the water situation in California is "bleak" and the state needs to act to bolster its entire aquatic ecosystem. "Our assessment of the current water situation [in California] is bleak," says Ellen Hanak, a Public Policy Institute of California economist. "California has essentially run out of cheap, new water sources."
The institute has released its findings in a publication written by a team of scientists, engineers, economists and legal experts from three University of California campuses and Stanford University, AAA ScienceMag.org reported Thursday.
Their report says water quality is deteriorating, pollution from agricultural runoff is increasing, and efforts to manage water and species recovery are hampered by a fragmented system of hundreds of local and regional agencies responsible for water supply, water treatment, flood control and land-use decisions.
"Today's system of water management, developed in previous times for past conditions, is leading the state down a path of environmental and economic deterioration," Hanak says. "We're waiting for the next drought, flood or lawsuit to bring catastrophe."
To stave off such a catastrophe, the report says, California needs to reform the way it manages water.
However, the study's authors say numerous entrenched interests, such as farmers, utility companies and landowners, have already proven reluctant to make sweeping changes.
"It's not going to be easy," says Jay Lund, a study co-author and director of the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences. "It's not going to be popular."
However, he says, the current system is failing. "This is an approach that is not working. We need to take a longer view of it."
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Ancient catastrophic drought leads to question: How severe can climate change become?

Ancient catastrophic drought leads to question: How severe can climate change become?

How severe can climate change become in a warming world? Worse than anything we've seen in written history, according to results of a study appearing this week in the journal Science.

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