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Saturday, August 6, 2011

U.S. Shale Gas: Less Abundance, Higher Cost

U.S. Shale Gas: Less Abundance, Higher Cost

Human influence on the 21st century climate: One possible future for the atmosphere

Human influence on the 21st century climate: One possible future for the atmosphere

New computer modeling work in the journal Climatic Change shows that by 2100, if society wants to limit carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to less than 40 percent higher than it is today, the lowest cost option is to use every available means of reducing emissions. This includes more nuclear and renewable energy, choosing electricity over fossil fuels, reducing emissions through technologies that capture and store carbon dioxide, and even using forests to store carbon.
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Montana weather linked to ocean temperatures near Peru

Montana weather linked to ocean temperatures near Peru

Researchers analyzed 100 years of data and found a significant link between extreme Montana weather and the ocean temperatures near Peru.

Indian Company Investigating Seaweed as Possible Biofuel

Indian Company Investigating Seaweed as Possible Biofuel

An Indian startup company based in Chennai, having spent several fruitless years investigating microalgae, more commonly referred to as simply algae, as a possible source of biofuels, has turned its attention to seaweed as a possible biofuel feedstock.
Sea6 Energy’s founders, four students and their professor at IIT Madras, India's leading technical institute, spent the last two years investigating algae’s biofuel potential, as have thousands of researchers worldwide, particularly in the U.S.
Eventually however, the quintet's calculations led them to the conclusion that algae’s possibilities as a biofuel feedstock laid many years in the future, The Economic Times reported.
Algae needs significant amounts
Read more...

Oil and Gas Pipelines at Risk from Ethanol Bacteria

Oil and Gas Pipelines at Risk from Ethanol Bacteria

Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology discovered that bacteria found in ethanol hasten the deterioration and cracking of pipeline steels.
Ethanol is a biofuel that is commonly used as a fuel additive because of its oxygen content and octane rating. Moreover, modified engines used ethanol solely as fuel.
Recently there have been proposals that existing gas pipelines and other infrastructure could be used to transport ethanol and increase its deployment. However, N.I.S.T. researchers exposed common pipeline steel to ethanol and found that ethanol and the bacteria found within can have a corrosive effect.
"Substantial increases in crack growth rates were
Read more...

Clean Coal and Underground Coal Gasification

Clean Coal and Underground Coal Gasification

The reserve limits for coal, for China as well as the rest of the world, can be postponed for several generations if the technology to gasify coal underground can be commercialized. Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) enables the access of deeper coal layers hitherto unavailable through conventional mining. Several modern pilot projects have been successfully completed in recent years and commercial projects are underway. _Rembrandt

Nigeria, Shell under fire after UN details oil devastation

Nigeria, Shell under fire after UN details oil devastation

Lagos (AFP) Aug 5, 2011
Nigeria's government and oil giant Shell Friday came under heavy pressure following the release of a landmark UN report detailing oil pollution that may require the world's biggest ever clean-up. The report set out scientific evidence for the first time of devastating pollution in Ogoniland, part of the country's main oil-producing Niger Delta region where Shell and the state petroleum compa

Czech Republic eyed for shale gas deposits

Czech Republic eyed for shale gas deposits

Prague, Czech Republic (UPI) Aug 5, 2011
The Czech Republic, where potential shale natural gas reserves have never been seriously searched for, has drawn new inquiries from energy companies, Prague says. The Czech Ministry of Environment says two companies seeking new sources of shale gas have filed formal applications for exploratory operations in the country and others are waiting in the wings, local reports indicate.

Friday, August 5, 2011

Future of seawater desalination studied

Future of seawater desalination studied
South Bend, Ind. (UPI) Aug 4, 2011 - U.S. researchers have reviewed the current state of seawater desalination technology and its potential as a sustainable solution to global water shortages. William Phillip of the University of Notre Dame and Menachem Elimelech at Yale University analyzed how seawater desalination technology has advanced in the past 30 years and in what ways the technology can be improved, a Notre Dame r ... more
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Devon Energy pioneers shale drilling and production

Devon Energy pioneers shale drilling and production

ConocoPhillips purchases Niobrara Shale acreage in Colorado

ConocoPhillips purchases Niobrara Shale acreage in Colorado

Devon sees great potential with Tuscaloosa Shale oil play in Louisiana

Devon sees great potential with Tuscaloosa Shale oil play in Louisiana

Sen. Vitter to block nominee until expiring Gulf of Mexico drilling leases extended

Sen. Vitter to block nominee until expiring Gulf of Mexico drilling leases extended

BOEMRE gives conditional approval for Shell exploration plan in Alaska's Beaufort Sea

BOEMRE gives conditional approval for Shell exploration plan in Alaska's Beaufort Sea

Nigerian oil pollution may need world's biggest clean-up: UN

Nigerian oil pollution may need world's biggest clean-up: UN
Abuja (AFP) Aug 4, 2011 - Decades of oil pollution in Nigeria's Ogoniland region may require the world's biggest ever clean-up, the UN environmental agency said Thursday as it released a landmark report on the issue. The United Nations Environment Programme also called for the oil industry and the Nigerian government to contribute $1 billion to a clean-up fund for the region that activists say has been devastated by ... more
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Thursday, August 4, 2011

La Nina's distant effects in East Africa: Droughts and floods are remote-controlled climate effects

La Nina's distant effects in East Africa: Droughts and floods are remote-controlled climate effects

For 20,000 years, climate variability in East Africa has been following a pattern that is evidently a remote effect of the ENSO phenomenon (El Nino Southern Oscillation) known as El Nino/La Nina. During the cold phase of La Nina, there is marginal rainfall and stronger winds in East Africa, while the El Nino warm phase leads to weak wind conditions with frequent rain.

Large variations in Arctic sea ice: Polar ice much less stable than previously thought

Large variations in Arctic sea ice: Polar ice much less stable than previously thought

For the last 10,000 years, summer sea ice in the Arctic Ocean has been far from constant. For several thousand years, there was much less sea ice in The Arctic Ocean -- probably less than half of current amounts.

Better desalination technology key to solving world's water shortage

Better desalination technology key to solving world's water shortage

Over one-third of the world's population already lives in areas struggling to keep up with the demand for fresh water. By 2025, that number will nearly double. A new Yale University study argues that seawater desalination should play an important role in helping combat worldwide fresh water shortages -- once conservation, reuse and other methods have been exhausted -- and provides insight into how desalination technology can be made more affordable and energy efficient.

Data Shows All of Earth's Systems in Rapid Decline

Data Shows All of Earth's Systems in Rapid Decline
By Stephen Leahy

UXBRIDGE, Canada, Jul 29, 2011 (IPS) - Protecting bits of nature here and there will not prevent humanity from losing our life support system. Even if areas dedicated to conserving plants, animals, and other species that provide Earth's life support system increased tenfold, it would not be enough without dealing with the big issues of the 21st century: population, overconsumption and inefficient resource use.

Solar storm heading our way

Solar storm heading our way
Early yesterday, (Aug 3, 2011) two active regions on the Sun, sunspot 1261 and 1263 unleashed solar flares, which was captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. The video shows an M6 class flare from 1261 in a couple of different wavelengths. SolarstormWatch, a citizen science project through the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, England predicts the solar storm from the larger flare to reach Earth at 15:00 UTC on August 5, 2011, and also predict direct hit on Earth.
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Does an Old EPA Fracking Study Provide Proof of Contamination?

Does an Old EPA Fracking Study Provide Proof of Contamination?

Game Changer


Game Changer

PetroVietnam pumps oil from Russian field

PetroVietnam pumps oil from Russian field
Hanoi, Vietnam (UPI) Aug 2, 2011 - A Russian-Vietnamese joint venture has produced its first oil from the Visovol oil field in the Nenets autonomous region of Russia. The Vietnam National Oil and Gas Group - PetroVietnam - and OAO Zarubezhneft formed the Rusvietpetro joint venture to work the bloc in Russia's Nenets Autonomous Okrug in Arkhangelsk Oblast. The Russian Federation-PetroVietnam Visovol oil field is ... more

Ethanol could be risk in U.S. pipelines

Ethanol could be risk in U.S. pipelines
Washington (UPI) Aug 3, 2011 - Plans to use existing U.S. pipelines to carry increasing ethanol production poses the problem the fuel can dramatically degrade them, researchers say. Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology warn that ethanol, and especially the bacteria sometimes found in it, can worsen fatigue crack growth rates by 25 times the rate in air alone. Researchers evaluated f ... more

Shell admits 'devastating' Nigeria oil spills

Shell admits 'devastating' Nigeria oil spills
London (AFP) Aug 3, 2011 - Oil giant Royal Dutch Shell on Wednesday accepted responsibility for two devastating oil spills in the Niger Delta which lawyers say have destroyed the livelihoods of a fishing community. The Bodo community took legal action in Britain against the Anglo-Dutch group over the spills in 2008 and 2009, which affected rivers and waterways over a large area. Lawyers said the leaks were "one of ... more

Floating production systems being ordered at record pace

Floating production systems being ordered at record pace


Offshore staff
WASHINGTON – The demand for offshore floating production systems is exhibiting strong growth, according to a recent report by International Maritime Associates, Inc (IMA). According to the report, fourteen floating production units have been ordered over the past four months – a record pace reflecting strong underlying market drivers.

Oil demand likely to climb, but supply remains less certain - report

Oil demand likely to climb, but supply remains less certain - report

EPA Takes First Step On Path Towards Fraccing Regulations

EPA Takes First Step On Path Towards Fraccing Regulations

Famine declared in three new Somali regions: UN

Famine declared in three new Somali regions: UN
Nairobi (AFP) Aug 3, 2011 - Famine has spread to three new regions of Somalia, including the capital Mogadishu and the world's largest camp for displaced people, the United Nations said Wednesday. In Washington, a US senator warned the catastrophe could be worse than Ethiopia's 1980s famine that claimed nearly one million lives and criticised the international community for its inadequate response to the crisis. Th ... more

In Your Backyard: New NRDC Web Tool Details How Climate Change Increases Threat of Infectious Disease, High Frequency of Drought, Flooding, Air Pollution in Southern States

In Your Backyard: New NRDC Web Tool Details How Climate Change Increases Threat of Infectious Disease, High Frequency of Drought, Flooding, Air Pollution in Southern States

Umami Sustainable Seafood Confirms Natural Bluefin Tuna Spawning at its Farm in Croatia

Umami Sustainable Seafood Confirms Natural Bluefin Tuna Spawning at its Farm in Croatia

Sea level rise less from Greenland, more from Antarctica

Sea level rise less from Greenland, more from Antarctica
Madison WI (SPX) Aug 04, 2011 -
During the last prolonged warm spell on Earth, the oceans were at least four meters - and possibly as much as 6.5 meters, or about 20 feet - higher than they are now. Where did all that extra water come from? Mainly from melting ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica, and many scientists, including University of Wisconsin-Madison geoscience assistant professor Anders Carlson, have expected ... more

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

United Nations IPCC Fourth Assessment Report on Climate Change

United Nations IPCC Fourth Assessment Report on Climate Change

In 2007, the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) produced its fourth report, delivering the latest consensus scientific understanding of global climate change. The voluminous document was summarized in “Climate Change 2007: A Synthesis Report” (PDF). A new, fifth IPCC report is expected to be published between 2013 and 2014. Much new, peer-reviewed research continues to emerge, but the 2007 report still stands as the definitive policy document expressing the world’s scientific consensus on issues related to climate change. (For an interim look at temperatures through 2010, see NASA’s GISS Surface Temperature Analysis.)

NASA Data Pit Scientific Method Against Climate Astrology



Op/Ed

 

NASA Data Pit Scientific Method Against Climate Astrology

NASA Says Computer Models Wrong About Climate Change

NASA Says Computer Models Wrong About Climate Change

An Echo Chamber of Climate Change Denial

An Echo Chamber of Climate Change Denial 

There was a startling demonstration last week of how quickly messages of climate change denial can spread from the United States to the United Kingdom.
The initial trigger was the publication of a paper by Roy Spencer and Danny Braswell of the University of Alabama in Huntsville in the journal 'Remote Sensing', called 'On the Misdiagnosis of Surface Temperature Feedbacks from Variations in Earth's Radiant Energy Balance'.

 

This Nebraska Village May Be Sitting On The World's Largest Untapped Deposit Of Rare Earth Minerals

This Nebraska Village May Be Sitting On The World's Largest Untapped Deposit Of Rare Earth Minerals

from Clusterstock

Documents: Natural Gas's Toxic Waste

Documents: Natural Gas's Toxic Waste

Fukushima Radiation Highest Ever, Exceeding Capacity of Measuring Device ... Fuel Likely Leaking Out Of Containment Vessel

Nuclear Explosions Since 1945 (Graphic)

Nuclear Explosions Since 1945 (Graphic)

Experts: La Niña, Climate Change Impact East African Drought from VOA News: Top Stories by Steve Baragona

Experts: La Niña, Climate Change Impact East African Drought

from VOA News: Top Stories

A Republican War on the Environment from Dissident Voice by Don Monkerud

A Republican War on the Environment

from Dissident Voice

The Earth is our home, we are its stewards

The Earth is our home, we are its stewards

Southern U.S. States to See Threat of Infectious Disease, High Rates of Drought, Flooding, Air Pollution, New Web Tool Finds

Southern U.S. States to See Threat of Infectious Disease, High Rates of Drought, Flooding, Air Pollution, New Web Tool Finds

PR Newswire
Biggest Impacts Seen in AL, AR, DC, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, VA and WV.
WASHINGTON, D.C. Residents of southern and southeastern United States experienced an increase in extreme weather conditions from 2000 through 2009, and projected climate change will only worsen the threat of infectious disease, drought, flooding, and air pollution, according to a new analysis of data by the Natural Resources Defense Council.
As much of the United States continues to suffer record hot summer weather, NRDC will hold a telephone-based news conference at 10 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, August 3, 2011 to release new, Web-based climate change impact maps and related analysis.
The analysis and related mapping will focus on the following states in the U.S. South:  Alabama; Arkansas; Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia, as well as Washington, D.C.
WHO:          
  • Kim Knowlton, senior scientist, Health and Environment Program, NRDC; and
  • Jeremy Hess, MD, MPH, FACEP, assistant professor and assistant research director, Emergency Medicine, Emory Schools of Medicine and Public Health, and senior medical advisors, Climate and Health Program, NCEH, U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

WHEN: Wednesday, August 3, 2011
TIME: 10 a.m. EDT
CALL-IN INFORMATION: Join the live, phone-based news conference (with full, two-way Q&A) at 10 a.m. EDT Wednesday, August 3, 2011, by dialing (800) 860-2442. Ask for the "NRDC climate impact maps" news event.
CAN'T PARTICIPATE?  A streaming audio replay of the news event will be available on the Web at http://www.nrdc.org  as of 1 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, August 3, 2011.
The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) is an international nonprofit environmental organization with more than 1.3 million members and online activists. Since 1970, our lawyers, scientists, and other environmental specialists have worked to protect the world's natural resources, public health, and the environment. NRDC has offices in New York City, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Livingston, Montana, and Beijing. Visit us at www.nrdc.org.
Contact:  Suzanne Struglinski, sstruglinski@nrdc.org, (202) 289-2387, and Leslie Anderson, landerson@hastingsgroup.com, (703) 276-3256
/PRNewswire-USNewswire -- Aug. 2, 2011/
SOURCE Natural Resources Defense Council

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Radioactive decay is key ingredient behind Earth's heat

Radioactive decay is key ingredient behind Earth's heat

Nearly half of the Earth's heat comes from the radioactive decay of materials inside, according to a large international research collaboration that includes a Kansas State University physicist.

Japan quake makes 2011 costliest disaster year

 Japan quake makes 2011 costliest disaster year

http://news.yahoo.com/50-states-see-record-highs-july-173203227.html

All 50 States See Record Highs in July

All 50 States See Record Highs in July

End Times? Texas Lake Turns Blood-Red

End Times? Texas Lake Turns Blood-Red

Promising Economic and Environmental Developments in Oil Sands Production

Promising Economic and Environmental Developments in Oil Sands Production

Scientists ‘lag behind’ as human impacts on the deep sea increase

Scientists ‘lag behind’ as human impacts on the deep sea increase

How vulnerable are nations to smaller shellfish harvests from ocean acidification?

How vulnerable are nations to smaller shellfish harvests from ocean acidification?

Highly Recommended Read

Highly Recommended Read

http://www.friendsjournal.org/earthquake-tsunami-and-nuclear-power-japan

Earthquake, Tsunami, and Nuclear Power in Japan
The Ocean of Light above the Ocean of Darkness
"...there was an ocean of darkness and death; but an infinite ocean of light and love, which flowed over the ocean of darkness." (George Fox, An Autobiography)

LLOG finishes up four offshore developments in th US Gulf of Mexico

LLOG finishes up four offshore developments in th US Gulf of Mexico

Archer to buy hydraulic fracturing firm Great White Energy Services for $742MM

Archer to buy hydraulic fracturing firm Great White Energy Services for $742MM

Ohio Governor 'thrilled' about Utica Shale potential

Ohio Governor 'thrilled' about Utica Shale potential

Russia's Gazprom Neft gains stake in four deepwater blocks offshore Cuba

Russia's Gazprom Neft gains stake in four deepwater blocks offshore Cuba

Brazil’s Deforestation Quagmire

Brazil’s Deforestation Quagmire

by: Elizabeth Rust, Council on Hemispheric Affairs | Report

White House Receives Blueprint for Bringing Gulf of Mexico Back to Health

White House Receives Blueprint for Bringing Gulf of Mexico Back to Health

PR Newswire
As Senators consider bill on oil spill penalties, conservationists urge lawmakers to invest fines in Gulf's natural systems and communities that need them
WASHINGTON, Aug. 1, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Leading conservation groups working across the Gulf of Mexico have submitted to the White House a blueprint for action that federal, state and local governments can take to restore the region's threatened natural systems and to help communities that rely on the Gulf for survival.
The groups delivered their recommendations to the Presidential Task Force on Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration, which President Obama created last October by executive order.  The task force is facing a one-year deadline this October to develop a comprehensive strategy "to effectively address the damage caused by the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, address the longstanding ecological decline, and begin moving toward a more resilient Gulf Coast ecosystem."
The timing of the groups' recommendations, entitled a Strategy for Restoring the Gulf of Mexico, is important.  The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee is expected to soon vote on legislation that would provide funding to implement the Presidential Task Force's restoration plans.  The Senate bill, the RESTORE Gulf Coast States Act, would dedicate 80 percent of the oil spill fines to restoring the Gulf's communities, economies and environments.  Under current law, most of the fines will be used for general government spending, rather than being directed towards the Gulf.
The recommendations were submitted by The Nature Conservancy, the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies (Texas A&M) University-Corpus Christi, National Audubon Society, Ocean Conservancy, National Wildlife Federation, Environmental Defense Fund, and the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation. The Presidential Task Force will unveil their final plan for Gulf restoration on Oct. 5.
"The Gulf is a national treasure and restoring it must be a national priority," said Wes Tunnell of the Harte Research Institute. "Too much time has already passed. We cannot miss this important opportunity to rebuild the Gulf and ensure it continues to support our nation's economy, communities and wildlife."
Among the recommendations included in the blueprint are:
  • Restoration activities should provide both environmental and social benefits.
  • Ensure sufficient delivery of freshwater flows to the Gulf in order to maintain ecological health of bays and estuaries.
  • Restore populations of endangered marine mammals, where their probability of extinction in the next 100 years is less than 1%.
  • Construct and operate a series of large-scale diversions of freshwater and sediment from the Mississippi River sufficient to build and sustain Delta wetlands to provide storm surge protection for people and restore habitat for economically vital fisheries.
  • Implement management plans for oyster reefs that support fish production, water filtration, nitrogen removal, coastal protection and other services that benefit both people and nature.

"If we really care about the Gulf and the communities that rely on it for survival, these fines must be used to restore the wetlands, marshes, oyster reefs, mangroves, fisheries and other natural resources that provide food, income and shelter to local communities – and the nation as a whole," said Cindy Brown, The Nature Conservancy's Gulf of Mexico Program Director. "The Gulf suffered the brunt of the spill and the fines should be used to bring the Gulf back to health."
"In order to successfully restore the Gulf, we must view the Gulf holistically — from the coast to marine waters — and focus on restoring the key services the ecosystem provides to coastal communities," said Chris Dorsett, Ocean Conservancy's Director of Fish Conservation & Gulf Restoration.
Even before the oil spill, the Gulf of Mexico faced serious threats from neglect, overdevelopment, pollution, storms, climate change and alteration of the Mississippi River Delta that feeds into the Gulf. Yet the Gulf still is one of the most productive natural areas in the world:
  • The five Gulf states, if considered an individual country, would rank 7th in global Gross Domestic Product. (NOAA)
  • The Gulf currently supports a $34 billion per year tourism industry (Oxford Economics), and its fisheries support more than $23 billion in seafood and commercial and recreational fishing-related activity (National Marine Fisheries Service).
  • The Gulf produces roughly 40 percent of all the seafood in the lower 48 states (National Marine Fisheries Service).
  • The region is home to 10 of our nation's 15 largest ports by tonnage. More than 25 percent of the nation's waterborne exports pass through Louisiana ports alone (American Association of Port Authorities).

"As terrible as it was, the oil spill focused the county's attention on what this ecosystem contributes to our economy and what it means to our natural heritage.  We must turn this awareness into a national commitment to restore and sustain this natural treasure," said Susan Kaderka, Regional Director for the National Wildlife Federation.
The environmental groups that submitted the recommendations pledged to continue working with federal and state lawmakers to ensure action is taken immediately to ensure the Gulf's productivity can be maintained and in many cases enhanced by bringing the region back to health.
"Although born of tragedy, there is a tremendous opportunity now for recovery of the Gulf.  But we must think big," said Chris Canfield, Vice President of Gulf Coast Conservation/Mississippi Flyway with the National Audubon Society. "We must look and work across political and organizational boundaries.  We know how to restore the Mississippi River Delta, to bring back wetlands and barrier islands, to make a better home for birds, fish and our communities.  All we need is the resolve to do it."
"We hope our recommendations will help the task force develop its strategy, but the task force can't implement its strategy without the necessary funding that the RESTORE Gulf Coast States Act provides," said Courtney Taylor, policy director for the Mississippi Delta Restoration project at Environmental Defense Fund. "That's why Congress must hold the parties responsible for Gulf oil spill damage accountable by passing the RESTORE Gulf Coast States Act to ensure that we invest the oil spill penalties to restore the Gulf, or we risk losing this ecological and economic treasure."
Contacts:

SOURCE Environmental Defense Fund

Monday, August 1, 2011

Radiation And Jet Stream Forecast Monitoring Sites

Radiation And Jet Stream Forecast Monitoring Sites

National Radiation Map

Radiation Network
Message Japan AK and HI Europe

 
Welcome to RadiationNetwork.com, home of the National Radiation Map, depicting environmental radiation levels across the USA, updated in real time every minute.  This is the first web site where the average citizen (or anyone in the world) can see what radiation levels are anywhere in the USA at any time.

                        Nuclear Site                 Alert Level = 100 CPM

Ex Japanese Nuclear Regulator Blames Radioactive Animal Feed on "Black Rain"

Ex Japanese Nuclear Regulator Blames Radioactive Animal Feed on "Black Rain"

Riki Ott & Tim Dickinson on BP Gulf disaster

Riki Ott & Tim Dickinson on BP Gulf disaster

Why Climate Scientists Are So Perturbed By JUSTIN GILLIS

Why Climate Scientists Are So Perturbed

Carbon smoke and mirrors - the reality of emissions reduction plans


Carbon smoke and mirrors - the reality of emissions reduction plans

Barry Brook | 2 August 2011 at 11:22 AM | Categories: Emissions, Policy | URL: http://wp.me/piCIJ-1gF

Biofuels' Potential to Transform the Global Economy

Biofuels' Potential to Transform the Global Economy

Slowly but surely, an extraordinarily important new industry is slowly taking shape, with the potential to transform the global economy.After years of existing largely as an environmentalist's fantasy, commercial production of biofuels for the world civil aviation industry is slowly becoming a fact, with production starting up across three continents.

Quake-volcano links probed

Quake-volcano links probed

Estimated 6.8-magnitude quake strikes off coast of Papua New Guinea

Estimated 6.8-magnitude quake strikes off coast of Papua New Guinea

Australia's warmest end to July in decades

Australia's warmest end to July in decades

Russian solar probe to predict Earthly cataclysms

Russian solar probe to predict Earthly cataclysms

Catastrophism in the Ring of Fire: seven 6.0+ earthquakes in eight days

Catastrophism in the Ring of Fire: seven 6.0+ earthquakes in eight days

August 1, 2011JAPANI’ve identified four areas on the Pacific Plate that have been a source of an inordinate amount of recent strong earthquake activity in the Pacific Ring of Fire. We’ve had seven 6.0+ magnitude earthquake events in eight days. I theorize that this spike in activity portends that a major geological event may be in the making in the Pacific. In June, I indicated that there was mounting evidence that we may be moving towards a period of geologic catastrophism in regard to rising agitation along the Pacific Plate. The 4 areas I’ve circled on the above map include the Aleutian peninsula or trench of Alaska, the Japan Islands, the New Guinea and Fiji region, and the last leg is the Tonga-Kermadec and New Zealand region. What all these regions on the Pacific Plate have in common is that they are densely populated with a turbulent chain of volcanoes. Since the western part of the plate is facing the most seismic stress, this leads me to believe the forces driving this are magmatic in nature and are the result of a thermal flux related to the internal planetary gradient. In short, if this whole region was a volcano, it’s now exhibiting signs of a major eruption. The sea-floor under the Atlantic Ocean is spreading and there is a lot of subduction going on in the Pacific where land masses are converging in some case but what’s alarming is something may be accelerating this process. -The Extinction Protocol

“Bottom up” ocean acidification: A study on the effects of CO2 on the bacterial community in sediments

“Bottom up” ocean acidification: A study on the effects of CO2 on the bacterial community in sediments

UAE's reach widens on land and from space

UAE's reach widens on land and from space

Jul 30, 2011 

DUBAI // With each pass over Japan’s ravaged landscape in the hours and days after March’s devastating earthquake and tsunami, DubaiSat-1 collected images of large swaths of toppled towns, scanned the dramatically altered coastline and zeroed in on the crippled Fukushima Daiichi power plant as it suffered a nuclear meltdown.
The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency requested the images directly from the Emirates Institution for Advanced Science and Technology (Eiast), which controls the satellite, as it struggled to piece together a clearer image of the disaster’s impact and a recovery plan.
Since the launch of DubaiSat-1 from Kazakhstan two years ago today, the country’s first Earth observation satellite has been useful to international authorities for pinpointing damage after natural disasters, to local municipalities for monitoring coastal erosion and to researchers for gauging the effects of harmful algal blooms.

Explainer: why ocean acidification is the ‘evil twin’ of climate change

Explainer: why ocean acidification is the ‘evil twin’ of climate change

NASA Satellite Tracks Severity of African Drought

NASA Satellite Tracks Severity of African Drought
Pasadena CA (JPL) Aug 01, 2011 - Northeast Africa continues to reel from the effects of the worst drought to strike the region in decades. The arid conditions are contributing to famines that the U.S. Department of State says are affecting more than 11.5 million people, particularly in Somalia, Ethiopia, Kenya and Djibouti. The drought is tied to strong La Nina conditions that prevailed in late 2010 and early 2011. La Nin ... more

Sunday, July 31, 2011

Editor's Note

Dear Readers
I am still on travel and will be out of commission for the next day or so. Will resume posting for a few
hours Monday morning, but then will be on air travel for a substantial portion of the rest of the day.
Stay tuned.
Michele Kearney

Meeting report available on ocean acidification and its impacts.

Meeting report available on ocean acidification and its impacts.

A Dolphin's Dilemma for Fishermen in the Gulf


Posted: 30 Jul 2011 05:22 AM PDT
Louisiana shrimp buyer Dean Blanchard has seen plenty of crazy things during his life in the bayou. But his eyes nearly popped out of their sockets the day he watched a mother dolphin pushing her dead baby calf  towards him as he stood on the commercial dock of his once thriving seafood business on Grand Isle.