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Friday, September 23, 2011

Can We Really Call Climate Science A Science?

Can We Really Call Climate Science A Science?

Scientists 100 Years Ago Recognized The CO2 - Climate Link

Scientists 100 Years Ago Recognized The CO2 - Climate Link

Climate change Skeptics need to look again. We have known about the CO2- climate change link for over 100 years.

How Will We Fuel the Future?

How Will We Fuel the Future?

‘Green’ Jobs Push Runs Out Of ‘Gas’ As Solyndra Fingerpointing Rages

By Jim Pierobon, September 23, 2011
With Solyndra executives take the Fifth Amendment to escape scrutiny form Congressional investigators, the ‘open’ season on Federal loan guarantees means any credible push for green jobs has run its course. That said, any continued finger-pointing holds opportunities and risks for both Democrats and the GOP. 'Jobs yes but leaving the green behind,' may be the way forward for presidential...  » Continue...

Breaking Oil's Monopoly on Transportation

By Geoffrey Styles, September 23, 2011
I've been thinking about an op-ed in Tuesday's New York Times written by a former National Security Advisor and a former CIA chief. They propose breaking oil's monopoly on transportation fuels by introducing more fuel competition at the point of use. This isn't a new idea, nor is their preferred tactic of requiring all vehicles sold in the US to be flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) capable of running...  » Continue...

G8 + 5 Joint Statement Climate Change and the Transformation of Energy Technologies for a Low Carbon Future

G8 + 5 Joint Statement
Climate Change and the Transformation of Energy Technologies for a
Low Carbon Future

Joint Science Academies Statement: Global Response to Climate Change

Joint Science Academies' Statement: Global Response to Climate Change

IAEA Nations Adopt Atomic Operations Reforms

IAEA Nations Adopt Atomic Operations Reforms

France calls for mandatory international nuclear checks

France calls for mandatory international nuclear checks

United Nations (AFP) Sept 22, 2011
France on Thursday called for an international rapid reaction force to handle nuclear crises and for mandatory international inspections of civilian nuclear programs.

A Misleadingly Optimistic Energy Forecast by the EIA

A Misleadingly Optimistic Energy Forecast by the EIA


(This guest post by Gail the Actuary appeared at The Oil Drum. It is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 U.S. License.)
The EIA published International Energy Outlook 2011 (IEO 2011) on September 19, showing energy projections to 2035. One summary stated, "Global Energy Use to Jump 53%, largely driven by strong demand from places like India and China."
It seems to me that this estimate is misleadingly high. The EIA is placing too much emphasis on what demand would be, if the price were low enough. In fact, oil, natural gas, and coal are all getting more difficult (and expensive) to extract. Prices will need to be much higher than today to cover the cost of extraction plus taxes countries choose to levy on energy extraction. The required high energy prices are likely to lead to recessionary impacts, which in turn will cut back demand for energy products of all types.
We live in a finite world. While it is true that huge resources of oil, natural gas, and coal are still theoretically available, we are starting to reach practical limits regarding extraction at prices that do not lead to economic contraction.

The Azimuth Project Barry Brook

The Azimuth Project

Barry Brook | 23 September 2011 at 5:13 PM | Categories: Clim Ch Q&A, Future | URL: http://wp.me/piCIJ-1iC
In the news recently, there was discussion of using helium balloons for geoengineering, as a method for dispersing aerosols or cloud-nucleation droplets into the atmosphere. (The proposal was critiqued here by George Monbiot). This idea is just the latest in growing field of science-based speculation on active climate system intervention, some of which has been discussed previously on BNC. However, this website, being a blog and discussion site, cannot hope to serve as comprehensive resource for technical evaluations. That is where The Azimuth Project looks to be extremely useful.
The website, a wiki of sorts, was established in late 2010 by mathematical physicist Dr John Baez, and is already a massive compendium (John also runs a blog). The motivation and goal is summarised as follows:
Welcome to the Azimuth Project!
The Azimuth Project is an international collaboration to create a focal point for scientists and engineers interested in saving the planet. Our goal is to make clearly presented, accurate information on the relevant issues easy to find, and to help people work together on our common problems.
Saving the planet
“Saving the planet” may sound pompous. But the very health of the planet is in peril because of the actions of humankind. Whether it is global warming, mass extinction, peak oil, or other problems, we need to be prepared on many fronts for an uncertain future.
Our goal is not to replace or compete with existing sources of information, but to provide a bird’s-eye view of the information that already exists. We want to make it easy for any scientist or engineer to understand the whole problem and understand specialist literature in many subjects outside their particular domain of expertise.
More explanation of the goals of the project, and how you can help out, is given here. There is also a discussion forum. I'd encourage you -- especially if you're technically inclined -- to check it out.
I've already found The Azimuth Project resource to be highly useful. For instance, regular BNC commenter and SCGI member Graham Cowan (who promotes the idea of boron-fuelled vehicles), has often talked about enhanced weathering as a potentially effective way to draw down CO2 that is already airborne (as opposed to capturing it at source, or intervening in other ways to cool the planet). After reading the AP page on the idea, I have a much better understanding of what he's driving at. There are similarly useful pages on everything from peak oil (and peak uranium) to sea level rise, to solar breeders, to me (!).
Read more of this post

Uncertain climate models impair long-term climate strategies

Uncertain climate models impair long-term climate strategies
London, UK (SPX) Sep 21, 2011 - A new paper published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A, explains weaknesses in our understanding of climate change and how we can fix them. These issues mean predictions vary wildly about how quickly temperatures will rise. This has serious implications for long term political and economic planning. The papers lead author is Dr Nigel Fox of The National Physical Laboratory ... more

http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Uncertain_climate_models_impair_long_term_climate_strategies_999.html
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Aquarius Yields NASA's First Global Map of Ocean Salinity

Aquarius Yields NASA's First Global Map of Ocean Salinity
Pasadena CA (JPL) Sep 23, 2011 - NASA's new Aquarius instrument has produced its first global map of the salinity of the ocean surface, providing an early glimpse of the mission's anticipated discoveries. Aquarius, which is aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D (Satelite de Aplicaciones Cientificas) observatory, is making NASA's first space observations of ocean surface salinity variations - a key component of Earth's climate. Salini ... more


The first global map of the salinity, or saltiness, of Earth's ocean surface produced by NASA's new Aquarius instrument reveals a rich tapestry of global salinity patterns, demonstrating Aquarius' ability to resolve large-scale salinity distribution features clearly and with sharp contrast. NASA/GSFC/JPL-Caltech.
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Thursday, September 22, 2011

Is "shale oil" the answer to "peak oil"?

Is "shale oil" the answer to "peak oil"?

Peak Oil - Now or Later? A Response to Daniel Yergin

Peak Oil - Now or Later? A Response to Daniel Yergin

Nitrate levels rising in northwestern Pacific Ocean

Nitrate levels rising in northwestern Pacific Ocean

Changes in the ratio of nitrate to phosphorus in the oceans off the coasts of Korea and Japan caused by atmospheric and riverine pollutants may influence the makeup of marine plants and influence marine ecology, according to researchers from Korea and the US.

The Climate Reality Project – An Inconvenient Next Step?

The Climate Reality Project – An Inconvenient Next Step?

Climate Change: An Accounting Problem

Climate Change: An Accounting Problem

The latest RealClimate post, which describes the latest ice melt data from Greenland, features this really important figure.

The Tea Party, the Dunning-Kruger Effect, and Climate Change - Too Sure of Themselves?

The Tea Party, the Dunning-Kruger Effect, and Climate Change - Too Sure of Themselves?

As Cara Horowitz posted about earlier on Legal Planet, some recent polling data emerged today regarding politics and global warming, looking at the views of Democrats, Republicans, Independents and the Tea Party.  The report was put together by the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication and the George Mason Center for Climate Change Communication.  The data contained lots of interesting information, but the most interesting tidbit to me was that:
"Tea Party members are much more likely to say that they are 'very well informed' about global warming than the other groups. Likewise, they are also much more likely to say they 'do not need any more information' about global warming to make up their mind."
Certainly being a specialist in an area does not always make one correct, but reading reports and keeping up with the science of climate change is part of what many of us do for a living. For me personally that is a task separate and apart from my politics, as there is plenty on both sides of the political spectrum with which I both agree and do not agree.  So while I have to rely on the understanding and processes of the scientists engaged in the research, due to my woeful scientific incompetence (I am not, after all, a climate scientist), I can still be somewhat sure from my review of the materials that 95% of scientists truly do maintain a consensus position on the human contribution to climate change, ocean acidification, etc.  Yet I have seen the mindset reflected in the poll when discussing the science of climate change, where I can throw paper after paper and report after report at someone and within minutes they are responding that it just cannot be true, that the debate is still open, etc.  Speed readers? I don't think so.
It reminds me of the Dunning-Kruger effect, but before I get into that let me make very clear that what I am discussing is a derivation of the actual effect. The actual effect is seen across all segments of society regardless of political affiliation, and involves less capable people overestimating their abilities while those more capable underestimate their own abilities relative to others.  But I wonder how this combines with political affiliation to cause people to purposefully put themselves in a position of being "less capable." By that I mean is there a bias toward not believing in climate change that is ideological, but that causes those people to exhibit some Dunning-Kruger-esque view that they are "very well informed" about global warming - more-so than folks who actually trust the science - and that they "do not need any more information"? This is certainly not an argument on my part that members of the Tea Party are less "capable" from an intellectual perspective. I have many, many extremely capable acquaintances who sympathize with the concerns of the Tea Party, but who simply aren't interested in digging deeper than Fox News to find the facts about climate change. Rather, it is that Tea Partiers seem to choose to put themselves into a position where their capability to understand and accept the science is compromised by their political views - they don't even want to track down the data and study it closely because if they do it might demonstrate something incongruous with their political viewpoints. Until one reads the reports and makes an effort to understand the science, that person is "unskilled" in the sense that Dunning-Kruger posits, and is prone to overestimate his or her skill in assessing the "truth" of climate change - just as unskilled as I am at performing surgery or engineering the construction of a building.
John Cook actually posted about Dunning-Kruger over on Skeptical Science last year.  The site is widely regarded as a respectable source that addresses the arguments for and against the human contribution to climate change.  Cook states:
There are many with a cursory understanding who believe they're discovered fundamental flaws in climate science that have somehow been overlooked or ignored by climate scientists. Some take this a step further and believe they're being deceived . . .
Cook provides the following example:
In the discussion on whether CO2 is a pollutant, a graph was included to show CO2 levels over the last 10,000 years. The graph includes ice core data for CO2 levels before 1950. For values after 1950, direct measurements from Mauna Loa, Hawaii were used.
CO2 Levels

A comment was posted querying the data in this graph. Here is the comment in full:
"Whoa, hold on a minute here. CO2 readings from ONE LOCATION prove we have an enormous GLOBAL spike in CO2 levels? You've got to be kidding me. This is science? That would be like me taking hydrological readings at the bottom of Lake Superior and then declaring that the entire surface of the earth must be covered with water based on my readings. 
By the way, isn't Mauna Loa an active shield volcano? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauna_Loa) Hmmmm, you don't suppose that's where all that extra CO2 came from, do you? C'mon, people, wake up. I find it shameful that this obvious manipulation is allowed to pass as "proof". This is certainly NOT an unbiased scientific conclusion."
The commenter is asking whether it's appropriate to take CO2 readings from one location. Particularly when situated near a volcano which are known to emit CO2. Surely a better metric would be a global average of CO2 levels? These are legitimate questions. However, I deleted this comment as our Comments Policy allows no accusations of deception, whether the attack is directed towards skeptics, scientists or myself. This restriction is necessary to keep discussion constructive and restricted to science. Unfortunately, the comment began with a commendable question and ended with a not-so-commendable personal attack.
If the comment had stayed on methods and not strayed into motive, I would have posted the following response. Mauna Loa was used is because its the longest, continuous series of directly measured atmospheric CO2. The reason why it's acceptable to use Mauna Loa as a proxy for global CO2 levels is because CO2 mixes well throughout the atmosphere. Consequently, the trend in Mauna Loa CO2 (1.64 ppm per year) is statistically indistinguishable from the trend in global CO2 levels (1.66 ppm per year). If I used global CO2 in Figure 1 above, the result "hockey stick" shape would be identical.
Unfortunately, this type of presumptive misunderstanding is seen all too often. Someone doesn't understand a certain aspect of climate science which is understandable considering the complexities of our climate. Rather than investigate further, they assume a flaw in the climate science or worse, an act of deception. This response is often more a reflection of the gap in their own understanding than any flaw in the climate science.
Perhaps most interesting when considering the Dunning-Kruger effect is that cross-cultural comparisons have demonstrated that Americans may be more prone to the effect than other cultures.  If so, perhaps it is not surprising that American acknowledgement of the threat of climate change trails almost the entire rest of the world: "People nearly everywhere, including majorities in developed Asia and Latin America, are more likely to attribute global warming to human activities rather than natural causes. The U.S. is the exception, with nearly half (47%) -- and the largest percentage in the world -- attributing global warming to natural causes. Americans are also among the least likely to link global warming to human causes, setting them apart from the rest of the developed world."
Ultimately, I wonder if the Tea Party suffers from a politics-induced version of the Dunning-Kruger effect, and simply does not want to dig deeper. Actually, maybe they do want to dig deeper, but only so they can continue to bury their head in the sand.
- Blake Hudson

What Could We Substitute For Canadian Tar Sands Oil?

What Could We Substitute For Canadian Tar Sands Oil?

Thoughts on Keystone XL

Thoughts on Keystone XL

Secretary Chu Advised on "Prudent Development" of Oil and Gas

Secretary Chu Advised on "Prudent Development" of Oil and Gas

Chu: Oil Demand, Prices Make Keystone XL “A Trade Off”

Chu: Oil Demand, Prices Make Keystone XL “A Trade Off”

A Storm of Anxiety Over Fresh Oil Batters the Gulf

A Storm of Anxiety Over Fresh Oil Batters the Gulf

What Could We Substitute For Canadian Tar Sands Oil?

What Could We Substitute For Canadian Tar Sands Oil?

At CIA, Climate Change is a Secret

At CIA, Climate Change is a Secret

http://www.fas.org/blog/secrecy/

Would Replacing Fossil Fuels with Biomass Reduce Co2 Emissions

Would Replacing Fossil Fuels with Biomass Reduce Co2 Emissions

One of the reasons governments have been pushing biomass burning is the notion that it would displace fossil fuels and thereby reduce CO2 emissions. Biomass is renewable and displaces fossil fuels. But would it reduce CO2 emissions?

Traces of Japan nuclear fallout in California rainwater

Traces of Japan nuclear fallout in California rainwater

BP oil not degrading quickly, study says

BP oil not degrading quickly, study says


The Associated Press
USA TODAY
September 21, 2011
Tar balls washed onto Gulf of Mexico beaches by Tropical Storm Lee this month show that oil left over from last year's BP spill isn't breaking down as quickly as some scientists thought it would, university researchers said Tuesday.
Auburn University experts who studied tar samples at the request of coastal leaders said the latest wave of gooey orbs and chunks appeared relatively fresh, smelled strongly and were hardly changed chemically from the weathered oil that collected on Gulf beaches during the spill.
The study concluded that mats of oil -- not weathered tar, which is harder and contains fewer hydrocarbons -- are still submerged on the seabed and could pose a long-term risk to coastal ecosystems.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Russian Strategic Interests Expand In the Arctic

Russian Strategic Interests Expand In the Arctic

EU Is Overrating Biofuels Benefits

EU Is Overrating Biofuels Benefits

New report suggests an error in estimates of greenhouse gas emissions.
A scientific committee of the European Union has published a report arguing that EU policies favoring biofuels are based on a "serious" error in calculating the overall greenhouse gas emissions associated with the fuels. The result, says the committee, is an underestimation that could have "immense" climate-related consequences.

Peak Oil Debunked

Peak Oil Debunked

Daniel Yergin's new book is a valuable guide to how energy drives the world's economy.
The timing of Daniel Yergin's new book, The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World, could hardly be better. With oil prices remaining high, with new sources of natural gas and oil being exploited around the world, and with demand for energy expected to reach new highs over the next several decades, Yergin sets out to explain the history, economics, and politics behind the world's continuing love affair with fossil fuels and show, too, just how hard it will be to end our dependence, given the earth's surprising, and seemingly endless, ability to enable it.

Deep under Lancashire, a huge gas find that could lead to 800 'fracking' wells

Deep under Lancashire, a huge gas find that could lead to 800 'fracking' wells

By Jonathan Brown

Drilling Down Regulation Lax as Gas Wells’ Tainted Water Hits Rivers

Drilling Down

Regulation Lax as Gas Wells’ Tainted Water Hits Rivers

Time to Boycott Tuna Again? By MARK BITTMAN

Time to Boycott Tuna Again?

HEARING FINDS LITTLE CONSENSUS ON IMPACT OF EPA RULES


HEARING FINDS LITTLE CONSENSUS ON IMPACT OF EPA RULES
In a Congressional hearing last week, commissioners from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and Public Utility Commissions of several states differed in their views of just how many coal plants could be shut down and how this may affect grid reliability if the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) implements several rules it has already finalized or proposed. Read More »

EPA Indefinitely Delays Power Plant Greenhouse Gas Rules POWERnews

EPA Indefinitely Delays Power Plant Greenhouse Gas Rules

5.1 magnitude earthquake strikes subduction zone south of Mount Tambora

5.1 magnitude earthquake strikes subduction zone south of Mount Tambora

September 21, 2011Sumbawa, INDONESIA – A 5.1 magnitude earthquake has struck the subduction plate of the ocean crust southwest of where the Mount Tambora volcano is located. According to the USGS, the earthquake had a depth of 44 km (27 miles) and the epicenter was 168 km (104 miles) SW of Bima, Sumbawa, Indonesia. Seismic tension and volcanic activity have escalated around Indonesia in the past month as volatility in the south Pacific Ring of Fire continues to build.The Extinction Protocol
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Creating a Sustainable World: Can it be Done?

Creating a Sustainable World: Can it be Done?

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Written by Editorial Dept   

Insurance market Lloyd's dives into red on catastrophes

Insurance market Lloyd's dives into red on catastrophes
London (AFP) Sept 21, 2011 -
The Lloyd's of London insurance market said Wednesday that it dived into first-half losses due to an unprecedented number of major natural catastrophes including the Japanese earthquake and tsunami. The company made a pre-tax loss of Pounds 697 million ($1.09 billion, 800 million euros) in the six months to the end of June, Lloyd's said in a results statement, as it was hit by soaring claims. ... more

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Typhoon-ravaged Japan also hit by earthquake

Typhoon-ravaged Japan also hit by earthquake

Germany To Fund New Coal and Gas Plants with Climate Money.

Germany To Fund New Coal and Gas Plants with Climate Money.

After Talking Water Supply, Cause of Quakes, Drilling Task Force Gets Down to Business

After Talking Water Supply, Cause of Quakes, Drilling Task Force Gets Down to Business

Captured: Somalia Famine

Captured: Somalia Famine

Secretary Chu Advised on "Prudent Development" of Oil and Gas

Secretary Chu Advised on "Prudent Development" of Oil and Gas

Staff race to save Fukushima plant from Japan storm

Staff race to save Fukushima plant from Japan storm
Tokyo (AFP) Sept 21, 2011 - Workers at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant on Japan's Pacific coast were racing against time to ready the crippled plant against a powerful typhoon heading straight for it, a spokesman said Wednesday. Loose cables and hoses were being tied down and efforts made to ensure radiation was not whipped up by winds that have been recorded at more than 200 kilometres (125 miles) an hour. Tea ... more

Canada poised to become global energy leader via oil sands - Deloitte

Canada poised to become global energy leader via oil sands - Deloitte

A new generation of oil titans; Western Hemisphere rivals OPEC as it moves toward self-sufficiency

A new generation of oil titans; Western Hemisphere rivals OPEC as it moves toward self-sufficiency

Utica Shale supports major job growth in Ohio - study

Utica Shale supports major job growth in Ohio - study

Finding New Offshore Regulator Difficult, Bromwich Tells Platts Energy Podium

Finding New Offshore Regulator Difficult, Bromwich Tells Platts Energy Podium

PR Newswire
WASHINGTON, Sept. 20, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Federal regulators have had some difficulty attracting candidates for the job of enforcing safety and environmental rules on offshore oil and gas drillers, Michael Bromwich, director of the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE), said Tuesday.
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Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Humanity falls deeper into ecological debt: study

Humanity falls deeper into ecological debt: study
Paris (AFP) Sept 20, 2011 - Humankind will slip next week into ecological debt, having gobbled up in less then nine months more natural resources than the planet can replenish in a year, researchers said Tuesday. The most dominant species in Earth's history, in other words, is living beyond the planet's threshold of sustainability, trashing the house it lives in. At its current pace of consumption humankind will  ... more

Japan warns one million to evacuate as typhoon nears

Japan warns one million to evacuate as typhoon nears
Tokyo (AFP) Sept 20, 2011 - More than a million people in Japan were warned to leave their homes on Tuesday as an approaching typhoon brought heavy rain and floods which left three dead or missing. Typhoon Roke, packing winds of up to 144 kilometres (89 miles) an hour near its centre, could land in central Japan Wednesday and move northeast, possibly towards the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, the Japanese weather ag ... more

Arctic sea ice reaches minimum 2011 extent

Arctic sea ice reaches minimum 2011 extent
Boulder CO (SPX) Sep 21, 2011 - The blanket of sea ice that floats on the Arctic Ocean appears to have reached its lowest extent for 2011, the second lowest recorded since satellites began measuring it in 1979, according to the University of Colorado Boulder's National Snow and Ice Data Center. The Arctic sea ice extent fell to 1.67 million square miles, or 4.33 million square kilometers on Sept. 9, 2011. This year's min ... more
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Journey to the lower mantle and back

Journey to the lower mantle and back

Bristol UK (SPX) Sep 19, 2011
The theory of plate tectonics is at the centre of our understanding of how the Earth works. It has been known for decades that new crust is formed at mid-ocean ridges and that this crust is subducted as plates dive underneath other plates in regions such as the Pacific Ring of Fire and descend into the Earth's mantle. What is not so well known is the fate of these subducted plates

Carbon cycle reaches Earth's lower mantle

Carbon cycle reaches Earth's lower mantle

Washington DC (SPX) Sep 19, 2011
The carbon cycle, upon which most living things depend, reaches much deeper into the Earth than generally supposed-all the way to the lower mantle, researchers report. The findings, which are based on the chemistry of an unusual set of Brazilian diamonds, will be published online by the journal Science
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Why America Needs to Accelerate Domestic Energy Production

Why America Needs to Accelerate Domestic Energy Production

Hadrian, the third of the “five good emperors” of Rome, ruled from 117 to 138 in a time of consolidation of the Roman Empire.  Best known for building Hadrian’s Wall, which marked the northern most reach of the Roman Empire, his policy focus was securing the Empire by leveraging its strengths rather than overextending its reach. Hadrian had a disciplined attention to detail and focused on the infrastructure needed not only to defend the Empire’s territory but leverage its resource potential and revenue growth.
Today’s economy is marked by uncertainty and the volatility at home and abroad. This uncertainty is causing
Read more...

Shale Gas and Fracking Important to Manufacturers’ Competitiveness

Shale Gas and Fracking Important to Manufacturers’ Competitiveness

Fracking: The Good, The Bad, And The Possibilities

Fracking: The Good, The Bad, And The Possibilities

BY FC Expert Blogger Dan McCarthyMon Sep 19, 2011
This blog is written by a member of our expert blogging community and expresses that expert's views alone.
If we're going to keep fracking, there are ways that we can make it safer, cleaner, and waste vastly less water.

Why population policy will not solve climate change – Part 1 from BraveNewClimate.com by Barry Brook

Why population policy will not solve climate change – Part 1

from BraveNewClimate.com

Japan’s Nuclear Disaster: Radiation Still Leaking, Recovery Still Years Away?

Japan’s Nuclear Disaster: Radiation Still Leaking, Recovery Still Years Away?

If nuclear power is so ‘safe,’ why is it that nuclear power stations are not placed where the power is most needed – in or very near large cities? Because they are dangerous. OK, if they’re dangerous, why is it the operators are not terribly interested in safety measures?
– Tony Boys, Can Do Better Blog1
Over six months have passed since the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan. What progress if any has been made to deal with what is surely one the worst industrial accidents in history?

Transatlantic trends: Weather change or climate change? from Shadow Government by Will Inboden

Transatlantic trends: Weather change or climate change?

from Shadow Government

New Evidence for Changing the Nature of the Global Economy

New Evidence for Changing the Nature of the Global Economy

Billion-dollar weather catastrophes this year, along with the latest figures on Chinese consumption, emphasize the urgency of a shift in economic thinking. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration cites 10 massive weather disasters in the U.S. this year, each exceeding a billion dollars. The nine months of unprecedented weather extremes include these estimates of death and damage: Hurricane Irene: 50 deaths and $7 billion; Upper Midwest flooding along the Missouri River: $2 billion;

Scientists raise concerns regarding erroneous reporting of Greenland ice cover

Scientists raise concerns regarding erroneous reporting of Greenland ice cover
Scientists from the Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI) have raised concerns regarding what they believe are erroneous claims of a 15% decrease in the permanent ice cover of Greenland in just 12 years.

NOAA researchers release study on emissions from BP/Deepwater Horizon controlled burns

NOAA researchers release study on emissions from BP/Deepwater Horizon controlled burns
During the 2010 BP/Deepwater Horizon Gulf oil spill, an estimated one of every 20 barrels of spilled oil was deliberately burned off to reduce the size of surface oil slicks and minimize impacts of oil on sensitive shoreline ecosystems and marine life. In response to the spill, NOAA quickly redirected its WP-3D research aircraft to survey the atmosphere above the spill site in June. During a flight through one of the black plumes, scientists used sophisticated instrumentation on board, including NOAA's single-particle soot photometer, to characterize individual black carbon particles.

The cause of Earth's largest environmental catastrophe

The cause of Earth's largest environmental catastrophe
Berlin, Germany (SPX) Sep 21, 2011 - The eruption of giant masses of magma in Siberia 250 million years ago led to the Permo-Triassic mass extinction when more than 90 % of all species became extinct. An international team including geodynamic modelers from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences together with geochemists from the J. Fourier University of Grenoble, the Max Plank Institute in Mainz, and Vernadsky-, Schm ... more

The Secret Lives of Solar Flares

The Secret Lives of Solar Flares
Huntsville AL (SPX) Sep 20, 2011 - One hundred and fifty two years ago, a man in England named Richard Carrington discovered solar flares. It happened at 11:18 AM on the cloudless morning of Thursday, September 1st, 1859. Just as usual on every sunny day, the 33-year-old solar astronomer was busy in his private observatory, projecting an image of the sun onto a screen and sketching what he saw. On that particular morning, h ... more

Washington DC Communication Research Series Examines the Climate Change Debate, Celebrity Scientists, the Iraq War, and Public Diplomacy

Washington DC Communication Research Series Examines the Climate Change Debate, Celebrity Scientists, the Iraq War, and Public Diplomacy

U.S. energy future lies beneath our feet T. BOONE PICKENS

U.S. energy future lies beneath our feet


T. BOONE PICKENS

Dawn of Golden Era for Gas Brings Energy Leaders Together to Debate EU Supply

Dawn of Golden Era for Gas Brings Energy Leaders Together to Debate EU Supply

Who to believe in fracking debate?

Who to believe in fracking debate?

Natural Gas Can Drive Our Economy

Natural Gas Can Drive Our Economy

EIA Reports Bearish Gas Build

EIA Reports Bearish Gas Build

Shale Gas Sector up to Fracking, Pipeline Challenges

Shale Gas Sector up to Fracking, Pipeline Challenges

Coal Remains Concerned about EPA

New York fracking lawsuit could set drilling precedent

New York fracking lawsuit could set drilling precedent

Carbon Dioxide May Destroy All Coral Reefs by the End of the Century

Carbon Dioxide May Destroy All Coral Reefs by the End of the Century
OilPrice.com
Feely's findings are just one sign of a troubling global phenomenon called ocean acidification. We spend a lot of time worrying about carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, as a form of pollution and also as a key greenhouse gas that traps solar heat. ...

Fracking the Finger Lakes Steve Coffman

Fracking the Finger Lakes Steve Coffman

Fracking Explained

'Fracking' Explained
34 min
Biology professor and geochemist Robert Jackson in Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment performed one of the first peer ...
youtube.com

ExxonMobil, Americas Petrogas seek shale gas in Argentina

ExxonMobil, Americas Petrogas seek shale gas in Argentina
Looking for shale oil and shale gas outside North America, ExxonMobil is helping to finance the exploration of shale in Argentina.

Forward to Friend USGS ups estimate of recoverable natural gas, gas liquids in Marcellus

Forward to Friend USGS ups estimate of recoverable natural gas, gas liquids in Marcellus
The Marcellus Shale contains about 84 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered, technically recoverable natural gas and 3.4 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable natural gas liquids according to a new assessment by the US Geological Survey.

Unconventional Resources Maps

Unconventional Resources Maps
Bakken shale infrastructure map
Looking for unconventional resource maps? Look no further than the UR Center on OGFJ.com. There you'll find location, facilities, and infrastructure maps of oil and gas plays throughout North America. Get the information you need to make informed business decisions about the Eagle Ford, Barnett, Haynesville, Marcellus, Bakken, Woodford, and more.

Halliburton to hire 11,000, mostly for Bakken Shale play

Halliburton to hire 11,000, mostly for Bakken Shale play

Share Chesapeake's first horizontal Utica result offers promising start to the play



Chesapeake's first horizontal Utica result offers promising start to the play

Monday, September 19, 2011

Farmers flee as world's deadliest volcano rumbles By NASRULLAH ROA

Associated Press

Farmers flee as world's deadliest volcano rumbles

By NASRULLAH ROA

Sunday, September 18, 2011

Planet sees dramatic spike in seismic activity for month of September

Planet sees dramatic spike in seismic activity for month of September


1. 6.9 earthquake Sikkim, India- September 18, 2011
2. 6.0 earthquake Honshu, Japan- September 16, 2011
3. 6.7 earthquake East Coast Honshu, Japan- September 16, 2011
4. 7.3 earthquake Fiji- September 15, 2011
5. 6.2 earthquake East Coast Honshu, Japan- September 15, 2011
6. 6.0 earthquake North Island, New Zealand- September 15, 2011
7. 6.1 earthquake Aleutian Islands, Alaska- September 14, 2011
8. 6.2 earthquake Papua New Guinea- September 12, 2011
9. 6.0 earthquake Vanuatu- September 11, 2011
10. 6.4 earthquake Vancouver Island- September 9, 2011
11. 6.6 earthquake Northern Sumatra- September 5, 2011
12. 6.3 earthquake Tonga- September 5, 2011
13. 6.1 earthquake Vanuatu- September 4, 2011
14. 7.0 earthquake Vanuatu- September 4, 2011
15. 6.2 earthquake South Sandwich Islands- September 3, 2011
16. 6.8 earthquake Fox Islands- September 2, 2011
17. 6.7 earthquake Santiago Del Estero, Argentina- September 2, 2011

A Seismic Monitor - web site

For those interested in knowing how stable the planet is, the following WEB site provides a great visual representation of how shaky the solid ground under us really is.

http://www.iris.edu/seismon/

Scientists Concerned By Continued Eruptions At Alaskan Volcano

Scientists Concerned By Continued Eruptions At Alaskan Volcano

Series of quakes hit off Japan disaster zone

Series of quakes hit off Japan disaster zone

Tokyo (AFP) Sept 17, 2011
A strong 6.6-magnitude undersea quake and a series of aftershocks hit off the coast of Japan's Honshu island Saturday, not far from the area ravaged by a huge March quake and tsunami, geologists said. There were no immediate reports of damage or casualties and no widespread tsunami warning, although the initial earthquake was followed by five more quakes of magnitude five or above, one of th

6.8-magnitude quake strikes northern India

6.8-magnitude quake strikes northern India

CNN - Harmeet Singh, Manesh Shrestha - ‎4 minutes ago‎
By the CNN Wire Staff Nepalese personnel in Kathmandu stand on the rubble of a British Embassy wall that collapsed in Sunday's earthquake. New Delhi (CNN) -- Eleven people -- six in India and five in Nepal -- died when a magnitude-6.9 earthquake struck ...

6.8 Earthquake Rattles India; At Least 8 Dead

6.8 Earthquake Rattles India; At Least 8 Dead

Earthquakes in India aren't rare, but a 6.8 magnitude quake is significant. The most recent quake in the country occurred on Sept. 7, when a 4.2 magnitude quake hit Delhi, where just hours earlier a bomb blast killed 11 and injured dozens more outside the Delhi High Court.
Delhi is considered to be in Zone 4 of the Earthquake Hazard Map of India, and it is therefore designated as being in the High Damage Risk Zone. There hasn't been a significant earthquake in the city's recent history, although it has experienced minor vibrations from quakes elsewhere in the country and in Pakistan.
Gangtok is also in Zone 4, and it is nestled between two Zone 5 (highest risk) areas to the east and west.
On Sunday, there were also earthquakes reported in Virginia and New Zealand, although they were significantly less potent than the Sikkim quake.

Peak Oil and the Unsustainable Growth in Oil Demand

Peak Oil and the Unsustainable Growth in Oil Demand

The release of the International Energy Agency's Oil Market Report for September is a good time to review the status of our ongoing crisis, for the report updates the IEA's latest thinking on the prospects for global oil. The IEA reports that its preliminary estimate for world oil production in August was 89.1 million b/d despite the loss of 1.6 million b/d of Libyan production. The Agency, however, maintains that the demand for oil has been running ahead of global production since the second half 2010 when the demand for oil surged.
The difference between supply and demand, which for a
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Interest in Alternative Biofuel Sources Increasing in the U.S.

Interest in Alternative Biofuel Sources Increasing in the U.S.

As researchers in the U.S. consider alternative biofuel sources beyond grain feedstocks such as corn and soybeans, everything from alligator fat to herbivore excrement is being subjected to study.
Currently these initiatives are largely local in scope and are targeting waste generated by meat processing. Amtrak, is now running a daily train service from Oklahoma City to Fort Worth, Texas which uses 20 percent biodiesel rendered from local beef fat debris from slaughterhouses. The beef fat-derived biodiesel, given the availability of raw material, is proving a cheaper option than ordinary diesel, both in cost and carbon emissions, worldcrops.com website reported.
More exotic
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A Crisis to Come? China, India, and Water Rivalry

A Crisis to Come? China, India, and Water Rivalry

Hu Jintao and Manmohan SinghChina's unique status as the source of transboundary river flows to the largest number of countries in the world and its water disputes with many of those countries has serious implications for India.

World's Dams Unprepared for Climate Change Conditions

World's Dams Unprepared for Climate Change Conditions

Dams have been designed for river flows that will soon no longer apply, according to new research

How Should New York Proceed on Hydrofracking?

How Should New York Proceed on Hydrofracking?

New York Times - ‎1
The League of Women Voters of New York State supports delay in issuance of hydraulic fracturing regulations until finalization of the Supplemental Environmental Statement (“Too Fast on Drilling,” editorial, Sept. 12).

Shale oil, gas wells drawing strong interest

Educational forum

Shale oil, gas wells drawing strong interest

Central Ohio Technical College and The Ohio State University at Newark hosted an educational forum Sept. 15 on Marcellus and Utica shale oil and gas development in Ohio.

Second lawsuit filed challenging gas drilling bans

Second lawsuit filed challenging gas drilling bans

Syracuse.com - Glenn Coin - ‎Sep 16, 2011‎
By Glenn Coin / The Post-Standard A Colorado gas driller filed a lawsuit today against the Tompkins County town of Dryden over the town's ban on gas drilling.

Natural gas firm sues NY town over drilling ban

Natural gas firm sues NY town over drilling ban

CanadianBusiness.com - ‎Sep 16, 2011‎
By AP | September 16, 2011 ITHACA, NY (AP) — A Denver-based natural-gas company has sued the town of Dryden in central New York in an effort to strike down a recent zoning law prohibiting gas drilling there.

Natural gas firm sues NY town over drilling ban

Natural gas firm sues NY town over drilling ban

BusinessWeek - ‎Sep 17, 2011‎
A Denver-based natural-gas company has sued the town of Dryden in central New York in an effort to strike down a recent zoning law prohibiting gas drilling there.

Perspectives: Environmental concerns bring activists together

Perspectives: Environmental concerns bring activists together

Oil economist: Fracking fears are unfounded

Oil economist: Fracking fears are unfounded

Lompoc Record - Daniel Dreifuss -
The American Petroleum Institute chief economist John Felmy, shows a diagram about how hydraulic fracturing in Santa Barbara County and California. The chief economist for the American Petroleum Institute defended the safety of oil and natural gas ...