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Saturday, March 3, 2012

Ocean acidification rate may be unprecedented

Ocean acidification rate may be unprecedented

New York NY (SPX) Mar 05, 2012
The world's oceans may be turning acidic faster today from human carbon emissions than they did during four major extinctions in the last 300 million years, when natural pulses of carbon sent global temperatures soaring, says a new study in Science. The study is the first of its kind to survey the geologic record for evidence of ocean acidification over this vast time period

Europe's Global Monitoring for Environment and Security Program Examined

Europe's Global Monitoring for Environment and Security Program Examined

Brussels, Belgium (SPX) Mar 02, 2012
Collecting environmental information about the present and future of home planet Earth is of critical importance. Space-based systems can help to appreciate how our planet and its climate are changing, the role played by human activities in spurring any global variations, and how such changes might influence our daily well-being.

Ancient Arabic writings help scientists piece together past climate

Ancient Arabic writings help scientists piece together past climate

London, UK (SPX) Mar 05, 2012
Ancient manuscripts written by Arabic scholars can provide valuable meteorological information to help modern scientists reconstruct the climate of the past, a new study has revealed. The research, published in Weather, analyses the writings of scholars, historians and diarists in Iraq during the Islamic Golden Age between 816-1009 AD for evidence of abnormal weather patterns.

BP in $7.8bn settlement of gulf claims

BP in $7.8bn settlement of gulf claims BP and the lawyers representing tens of thousands of victims of the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill have reached an $7.8bn out-of-court settlement over damages, a US judge has said, delaying the trial that had been due to start on Monday.

In a statement on Friday night, Judge Carl Barbier of the federal district court in New Orleans said “plaintiffs’ counsel and counsel for BP have reached an agreement on the terms of a proposed class settlement which will be submitted to the court for approval.”

http://link.ft.com/r/73UJGG/DW1JXT/RNF1Y5/U10PC5/ZGDSST/QR/h?a1=2012&a2=3&a3=2

Friday, March 2, 2012

Suck It Up: A book about climate change, geoengineering and air capture of CO2

Suck It Up: A book about climate change, geoengineering and air capture of CO2

 Editor's note: Marc Gunther is a long-time advisory board member and contributor to TEC. Congratulations to Marc on the publication of his new book!

Beyond Keystone: The Real Climate Debate

Beyond Keystone: The Real Climate Debate

Deborah Gordon, Politico
The Keystone XL pipeline debate and the entire oil sands discussion is being framed as a choice between energy security and climate security. This false dichotomy masks the real issue: How to manage the climate effects of the shift from conventional oils to unconventional oils like oil sands "” projected to comprise 40 percent of global oil supplies by 2040.Environmentalists say approving the Keystone XL pipeline would lock the world into a global warming trajectory that guarantees economic destruction, widespread human suffering and species extinction.

Current Rate of Ocean Acidification Worst in 300 Million Years

Current Rate of Ocean Acidification Worst in 300 Million Years
Posted: 02 Mar 2012 01:42 AM PST
Science has published a troubling but not entirely surprising article on the fact that the oceans are acidifying at the fastest rate in 300 million years. Actually, it could be the fastest rate over an even longer time period, but we can only go back with any degree of accuracy for 300 million years.
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Thursday, March 1, 2012

Present ocean acidification rates are unprecedented: research

Present ocean acidification rates are unprecedented: research
The world's oceans may be turning acidic faster today from human carbon emissions than they did during four major extinctions in the last 300 million years, when natural pulses of carbon sent global temperatures soaring, says a new study in Science. The study is the first of its kind to survey the geologic record for evidence of ocean acidification over this vast time period.

New study of global freshwater scarcity

New study of global freshwater scarcity
A new report published in the online journal PLoS ONE, analyzing water consumption in 405 river basins around the world, found that water scarcity impacts at least 2.7 billion people for at least one month each year.

The physics of earthquake forecasting

The physics of earthquake forecasting
One year on from the magnitude-9.0 earthquake that unleashed a devastating tsunami and caused a partial meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, this month's special issue of Physics World, on the theme of "Physics and the Earth", includes an investigation by journalist Edwin Cartlidge into the latest advances in earthquake forecasting.

Experts call for cleaner air to tackle invisible killer

Experts call for cleaner air to tackle invisible killer
Urgent action is needed to reduce the high concentrations of dangerous air pollutants in Europe, according to experts writing in the European Respiratory Journal today (1 March 2012).

- New study links dust to increased glacier melting, ocean productivity


- New study links dust to increased glacier melting, ocean productivity

Bingaman Clean Energy Standard Restarts Dialogue on Need for More Clean Energy

Bingaman Clean Energy Standard Restarts Dialogue on Need for More Clean Energy

Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.), chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, released a bill today that would create a clean energy standard, which the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) called “a welcome step.”

The physics of earthquake forecasting


The physics of earthquake forecasting
Science Codex
One year on from the magnitude-9.0 earthquake that unleashed a devastating tsunami and caused a partial meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, this month's special issue of Physics World, on the theme of "Physics and the Earth", ...
See all stories on this topic »

Sea level rise to alter economics of California beaches: Certain beaches will shrink, others remain large

Sea level rise to alter economics of California beaches: Certain beaches will shrink, others remain large

Rising sea levels are likely to change Southern California beaches in the coming century, but not in ways you might expect. While some beaches may shrink or possibly disappear, others are poised to remain relatively large -- leaving an uneven distribution of economic gains and losses for coastal beach towns, according to a new study.

Thickest parts of Arctic ice cap melting faster

Thickest parts of Arctic ice cap melting faster

A new study revealed that the oldest and thickest Arctic sea ice is disappearing at a faster rate than the younger and thinner ice at the edges of the Arctic Ocean's floating ice cap.

Major offshore oil discovery made in Brazil

Major offshore oil discovery made in Brazil
A joint Brazilian offshore oil venture has struck what Spanish energy company Repsol YPF SA refers to as a "high-impact well."
Full Article

TransCanada to build southern leg of Keystone oil pipeline

TransCanada to build southern leg of Keystone oil pipeline
Canadian oil company TransCanada announced on Tuesday, November 28, that it plans to construct a small portion of the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline separately from the rest of the project.
Full Article

Cuba Drills for Oil, But U.S. Unprepared for Spill By: William Booth | The Washington Post

Cuba Drills for Oil, But U.S. Unprepared for Spill
By: William Booth | The Washington Post

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Study finds thickest parts of Arctic ice cap melting faster

Study finds thickest parts of Arctic ice cap melting faster
A new NASA study revealed that the oldest and thickest Arctic sea ice is disappearing at a faster rate than the younger and thinner ice at the edges of the Arctic Ocean's floating ice cap.

Meeting biofuel production targets could change agricultural landscape

Meeting biofuel production targets could change agricultural landscape
Almost 80 percent of current farmland in the U.S. would have to be devoted to raising corn for ethanol production in order to meet current biofuel production targets with existing technology, a new study has found. An alternative, according to a study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, would be to convert 60 percent of existing rangeland to biofuels.

Time to act to prevent worsening global environmental deterioration, say experts (PhysOrg.com) -- Saving the environment requires more action in the form of a “social avalanche”, a group of world experts has demanded.

Time to act to prevent worsening global environmental deterioration, say experts
(PhysOrg.com) -- Saving the environment requires more action in the form of a “social avalanche”, a group of world experts has demanded.

Less is more: Advancing enhanced oil recovery and geologic sequestration of CO2

By George Peridas, February 29, 2012
Today, the National Enhanced Oil Recovery Initiative (NEORI) released its recommendations for advancing CO2-enhanced oil recovery. The Initiative comprises stakeholders from many different walks of life: environmental groups, technology vendors, public and investor-owned utilities, labor, ethanol, fuel producers and project developers. The Initiative has its own website, where the report and...  » Continue...

How to Feed the World by 2050

How to Feed the World by 2050
PARIS, February 28, 2012/PRNewswire/ --

The planet is quantitatively capable of feeding its 7 billion inhabitants, though one billion people suffer from hunger and another 1.4 billion are overweight. This disequilibrium could even be greater by 2050, when we are expected to hit 9 billion people. Will the Earth be able to feed all these men and women when resources become scarce and climate change strongly threatens global food systems? This month, Marion Guillou, President of the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA) [http://www.international.inra.fr ], and Gerard Matheron, President of the International Cooperative Centre for Agronomical Research for Development (CIRAD) [http://www.cirad.fr/en/home-page ], have published The World's Challenge, Feeding 9 Billion People [http://www.quae.com/en/r1409-the-world-s-challenge.html ].

To view the Multimedia News Release, please click:

http://www.multivu.com/mnr/53765-editions-quae-bourin

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Himalayan Sherpas lament climate change devastation

Himalayan Sherpas lament climate change devastation

Gati, Nepal (AFP) Feb 26, 2012
Climate change is altering the face of the Himalayas, devastating farming communities and making Mount Everest increasingly treacherous to climb, some of the world's top mountaineers have warned. Apa Sherpa, the Nepali climber who has conquered Mount Everest a record 21 times, said he was disturbed by the lack of snow on the world's highest peak, caused by rising temperatures. "In 1989 w

Early ripening of grapes pinned to warming, soil moisture

Early ripening of grapes pinned to warming, soil moisture

Paris (AFP) Feb 26, 2012
Researchers in Australia say they have pinpointed key factors in the early ripening of grapes, providing potential answers for wine growers threatened by global warming. In Australia and Western Europe, there is an abundance of anecdotal evidence linking higher temperatures with earlier grape maturation, a phenomenon that can affect the quality of table wine. But wine growing and climate

Climate change may increase risk of water shortages in hundreds of US counties by 2050

Climate change may increase risk of water shortages in hundreds of US counties by 2050

Washington DC (SPX) Feb 27, 2012
More than 1 in 3 counties in the United States could face a "high" or "extreme" risk of water shortages due to climate change by the middle of the 21st century, according to a new study in ACS's Journal of Environmental Science and Technology. The new report concluded that 7 in 10 of the more than 3,100 U.S. counties could face "some" risk of shortages of fresh water for drinking, farming

Radium Testing of Groundwater Shows Most Susceptible Regions are Central U.S. and East Coast

Radium Testing of Groundwater Shows Most Susceptible Regions are Central U.S. and East Coast

Reston, VA (SPX) Feb 27, 2012
Groundwater in aquifers on the East Coast and in the Central U.S. has the highest risk of contamination from radium, a naturally occurring radioactive element and known carcinogen. According to a study conducted by the USGS, radium was detected in concentrations that equaled or exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standards in more than one in five wells tested in t

China Shuts Down GE Rice?

China Shuts Down GE Rice?

China’s State Council has released a ground-breaking draft proposal of a grain law that establishes legislation restricting research, field trials, production, sale, import and export of genetically engineered grain seeds. The draft stipulates that no organization or person can employ unauthorized GE technology in any major food product in China. “This is actually a world-first initiative that deals with GE food legislation at state law level,” according to my colleague, Fang Lifeng, a food and agriculture campaigner with Greenpeace. “There are currently too many loopholes and weak control over GE food and technology in China. This law needs to clarify what ‘relevant laws and regulations’ can be applied to regulate GE crops. We urge legislators to accelerate the legislation of Genetically Engineered Organisms Bio-safety Law, and also to enhance the supervision of GE food and other products. Otherwise, this law will only be paying lip service,” Fang warned. The grain law will likely ... Read More...

The Wages of Eco-Angst By DAVID ROPEIK

February 26, 2012, 5:00 pm

The Wages of Eco-Angst

Anxiety
Anxiety: We worry. A gallery of contributors count the ways.
Even today, when media warnings about the latest health or safety risk are commonplace, the incessant drumbeat of reported environmental hazards can be truly alarming, leaving us worried, like the followers of Chicken Little, that the sky really is falling. But while plenty of these threats are serious, some of the most frightening eco-bogeymen are not nearly the dangers that many presume.
Real dangers can arise when we get risk wrong.
Nuclear radiation, for example, still tangled in many minds with images of atomic blasts, mutant Godzillas and rampant cancer, is nowhere near as harmful to human health as most believe. Industrial chemicals at high enough doses are certainly dangerous, but most, at the low doses to which we’re exposed, are not. Oil spills are certainly horrible, but it takes just a few years before the dynamic ocean breaks down most of the mess — even for the really bad ones — and the recovery is well underway.

Big Food Must Go: Why We Need to Radically Change the Way We Eat

Big Food Must Go: Why We Need to Radically Change the Way We Eat

This is not a problem we can solve by going vegetarian or vegan, or buying organic and fair trade.

Japan Earthquake Anniversary: Photos From Before And After Tsunami Show ...

Japan Earthquake Anniversary: Photos From Before And After Tsunami Show ...
Huffington Post
"This is the kind of earthquake that hits once every 100 years," restaurant worker Akira Tanaka told the BBC. More information about the tsunami and Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster slowly has trickled out, with orphaned photos still finding their ...

Research Guides


Research Guides
 
 

Environmental legal research guide [electronic resource] / compiled by Taryn Rucinski

Hydraulic fracturing (Hydrofracking) [electronic resource] / compiled by Taryn Rucinski

National Environmental Policy Act legal research [electronic resource] / compiled by Taryn Rucinski

New York environmental legal research guide [electronic resource] / compiled by Taryn Rucinski

Food-chain unraveling: Livestock plagues hit U.S., Nepal, and UK, mystery virus killing numerous animals

Food-chain unraveling: Livestock plagues hit U.S., Nepal, and UK, mystery virus killing numerous animals

MAURY COUNTY, Tenn. — Horses are dying and now cattle as well and detectives in Maury County have been at a loss to explain how or why it is happening. First, seven seemingly healthy horses turned up dead last week at a Hampshire farm in Maury County.  The state performed a necropsy and released the results. “They ruled that it’s undetermined. The cause of death cannot be determined at this time. It is a mystery. We don’t know what happened,” said Detective Terry Chandler with the Maury County Sheriff’s Department. Now Detective Chandler is investigating more deaths: Two dead cows at a farm across from the one where the seven horses were found. And he’s consulting with police looking into more mysterious horse deaths in Dickson and Giles County. Chandler said there is no evidence anyone is intentionally harming the animals. He said they have not ruled out the possibility the livestock died from eating contaminated hay or a poison plant.  It’s possible the toxins were not detected by the state testing. –News Channel 5

The IPCC May Have Outlived its Usefulness - An Interview with Judith Curry

The IPCC May Have Outlived its Usefulness - An Interview with Judith Curry

As the global warming debate increases in its intensity we find both sides deeply entrenched, hurling accusations and lies at one another in an attempt to gain the upper hand. This divide within the scientific community has left the public wondering who can be trusted to provide them with accurate information and answers.The IPCC, the onetime unquestioned champion of climate change, has had its credibility questioned over the years, firstly with the climategate scandal, then with a number of high profile resignations, and now with the new “Gleickgate”…Read more...

China Pursues Shale Gas as a Cleaner Alternative to Coal

China Pursues Shale Gas as a Cleaner Alternative to Coal

Over the past twenty years, China has experienced dramatic economic growth, transforming itself from a basically agrarian society into the world’s second largest economy behind only the United States. Since the initiation of economic and political reforms in 1978, China has produced an average annual growth rate of 10 percent. From 1978 to 2008, China increased its GDP 83 times (NBS, 2009) and lifted over two hundred million of its people out of poverty. This has continued to generate increased energy supply. Within China’s energy sector,…Read more...

How to Frack Responsibly

How to Frack Responsibly

Joe Nocera, New York Times
To put it another way, the technique of hydraulic fracturing, used to extract natural gas from once-impossible-to-get-at reservoirs like the Marcellus Shale that lies beneath New York and Pennsylvania, has more than proved its value. . .

Did Government Create the Shale Gas Boom?

Did Government Create the Shale Gas Boom?

Kenneth Green, American
As I wrote in AEI:s online magazine The American, governments, and their supporters, are fond of pulling what I call a Ferris Bueller: seeing a parade pass by, they jump up on a float, sing loudly, dance vigorously, and then claim credit for the parade.Or, as I told a talk-radio host who observed that oil and gas production has increased since Obama was elected, "Yes, well the date on the calendar has also advanced since Obama was elected, but that doesnt mean Obama caused either to advance"; (We debunked the Obama-the-oil-producer claim here.)

Monday, February 27, 2012

Study: Arctic sea ice decline may be driving snowy winters seen in recent years

Study: Arctic sea ice decline may be driving snowy winters seen in recent years
A new study led by the Georgia Institute of Technology provides further evidence of a relationship between melting ice in the Arctic regions and widespread cold outbreaks in the Northern Hemisphere. The study's findings could be used to improve seasonal forecasting of snow and temperature anomalies across northern continents.

NEI Files Lawsuit to Reverse Interior's Withdrawal of Land From Uranium Mining

The Nuclear Energy Institute, together with the National Mining Association (NMA), today filed a lawsuit in U.S. Federal District Court in Arizona seeking to reverse the Obama administration’s withdrawal of approximately 1 million acres of federal land in the Arizona Strip for uranium mining for 20 years.

2 billion barrels of oil potential in USGS assessment of North Slope Shale

2 billion barrels of oil potential in USGS assessment of North Slope Shale
Royale Energy, Inc. reports that the U.S. Geological Survey has estimated the potential of undiscovered onshore shale oil and gas reserve resources in Alaska's North Slope.
Full Article

Macondo partners 'facing billions in fines'

Macondo partners 'facing billions in fines'
BP and Anadarko Petroleum have been exposed to billions of dollars in potential fines.
Full Article

Sustainable Development and Climate Change

By Sam Wurzelmann, February 27, 2012
The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, Rio+20, is on the horizon. The event taking place this June, twenty years after the first Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, can serve as a reminder for lawmakers in Washington, DC of the impact of their work beyond the beltway and throughout the increasingly globalized planet. As noted in the ‘7 Critical Issues at Rio+20’, sustainable...  » Continue...

Sunday, February 26, 2012

Japan fears permanent ban on habitation near nuclear plant

Japan fears permanent ban on habitation near nuclear plant

Tokyo (AFP) Feb 24, 2012
Japan on Friday said some areas surrounding the Fukushima nuclear power plant that was wrecked last year by a massive tsunami will likely remain permanently off-limits. Measurements taken between November and January confirm earlier results which show a level of radioactivity of 470 millisierverts per year when the average, under normal conditions, is less than one per year, according to a g

Protesters to Keystone XL Pipeline: Don't Mess With Texas

Protesters to Keystone XL Pipeline: Don't Mess With Texas

As Congressional Republicans and Big Oil allies in Washington try to resuscitate the massive Keystone XL tar sands pipeline, people on the frontlines have opened a new campaign to stop the massive $7 billion project. In Texas, landowners are locking arms to fight would-be pipeline builder TransCanada over eminent domain cases that may determine where the 1700-mile project will be built.

“BP: The case of the century”

BP: The case of the century” FT. In charge of the Deepwater Horizon negotiations: DOJ’s Thomas J. Perrelli, who oversaw Obama’s mortgage “settlement” Pravda.