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Friday, March 23, 2012

Climate disarray: skipping spring and going straight to summer

March 23, 2012CHICAGOThe United States and parts of Canada have come out of winter to find a lingering ridge of high pressure inducing summer-like conditions. The map above shows surface temperature anomalies during March 13-19 compared to averages for those dates over the last 10 years. More than 1,054 locations set new daily high temperatures records and 627 saw new record lows. “Records are not only being broken across the country, they’re being broken in unusual ways,’ reports NASA’s Adam Voiland. “Chicago, for example, saw temperatures above 26.6° Celsius (80° Fahrenheit) every day between March 14-18, breaking records on all five days. For context, the National Weather Service noted that Chicago typically averages only one day in the eighties each in April. And only once in 140 years of weather observations has April produced as many 80°Fahrenheit days as this March,” Volland wrote. “Meanwhile, Climate Central reported that in Rochester, Minnesota, the overnight low temperature on March 18 was 16.6° Celsius (62° Fahrenheit), a temperature so high it beat the record high of 15.5°Celsius (60° Fahrenheit) for the same date,” Volland added. –Discovery News

James Cameron might have embarked on his historic solo dive to the Ocean's Deepest Point

James Cameron might have embarked on his historic solo dive to the Ocean's Deepest Point

The National Geographic Deep Sea Challenge site proclaims This is the New Age of Exploration.

Energy requirements make Antarctic fur seal pups vulnerable to climate change

Energy requirements make Antarctic fur seal pups vulnerable to climate change

Santa Cruz CA (SPX) Mar 23, 2012
A new study suggests that climate change could pose a risk for Antarctic fur seals in their first few months of life. The study, published in the journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, found that changing weather conditions can impact the metabolic rates of fur seal pups. Climate models predict windier and wetter conditions in Antarctica in the coming years, and that could cause

Researchers describe method for cleaning up nuclear waste

Researchers describe method for cleaning up nuclear waste

Notre Dame IN (SPX) Mar 23, 2012
While the costs associated with storing nuclear waste and the possibility of it leaching into the environment remain legitimate concerns, they may no longer be obstacles on the road to cleaner energy. A new paper by researchers at the University of Notre Dame, led by Thomas E. Albrecht-Schmitt, professor of civil engineering and geological sciences and concurrent professor of chemistry and

Clinton warns of terrorism, instability over water

Clinton warns of terrorism, instability over water

Washington (AFP) March 22, 2012
US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton warned Thursday of the risk of terrorism, political instability and conflict over competition for scarce water supplies worldwide over the next few decades. Clinton highlighted such risks that were outlined in the unclassified version of a report on global water security - which she had requested - that was released Thursday

Annual OSPAR report on dumping of wastes or other matter at sea in 2009 -- OSPAR

Fracking Fluid Soaks Ohio

Fracking Fluid Soaks Ohio
BusinessWeek
By Mark Niquette on March 22, 2012 The nationwide boom in hydraulic fracturing—aka fracking—means energy-extraction companies in the US can produce thousands of barrels of oil and millions of cubic feet of natural gas from once-inaccessible places.

EPA Putting Oil Refineries Out of Business

EPA Putting Oil Refineries Out of Business

Editorial, Investors
Fearing gas price spikes on the East Coast this summer, Washington pols are trying to talk refiners out of closing unprofitable plants. It's the EPA they ought to hector. The untold story behind soaring pump prices is that major U.S. refineries are going out of business and creating at least regional shortages thanks in no small part to costly EPA rules. . .

South American drought spreads to Brazil from The Extinction Protocol: 2012 and beyond by The Extinction Protocol

South American drought spreads to Brazil

Media news station attempts to unravel enigma of bird deaths

Media news station attempts to unravel enigma of bird deaths

March 23, 2012ARKANSAS - Remember New Year’s Eve 2010 when thousands of birds mysteriously dropped from the sky over Beebe, Arkansas? Well, the mystery has been solved. Last May, a crew from the National Geographic Channel dropped by the NewsChannel5 Weather Office. They wanted to see what important information we had found regarding the bird deaths over Beebe. Indeed, my research indicated a unique radar signature several thousand feet above the birds just as the mass deaths were occurring. With the help of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a unique weather phenomenon was blamed for startling the birds and causing the mayhem that resulted in the demise of thousands of birds that night. On Thursday, an all-new National Geographic Special will debut explaining the Beebe event as well as several other mass animal deaths that occurred last winter. The show, Omens of the Apocalypse,” airs on the National Geographic Channel at 10 p.m.

Is North America the New Middle East for Oil?

Is North America the New Middle East for Oil?

With the President of the United States currently playing the role of pessimist-in-chief with regard to US energy independence, it's refreshing to see that goal raised as a serious possibility by someone whose experience and position give him deeper insights on the subject. A few years ago Ed Morse was running the oil trading operation for Hess, and now he's at Citigroup.

"A Substantial Failure" Of Energy Education

"A Substantial Failure" Of Energy Education

It is a curious thing when a mindset develops. Thoughts, data interpretation, reactions, and behaviors become solidified into expectations about what is normal and what is to come as that sense of normal changes. It's an important process of human development, and it is a particularly interesting thing to look at on a national scale -- and when it comes to American perspectives on energy, attempting to sort out the present  situation requires looking at what 'we', the collective USA, have been telling ourselves.Earlier this week, Michale Spence exclaimed:

Green Groups Embrace Climate Pragmatism from The Energy Collective - The world's best thinkers on energy & climate by JesseJenkins

Green Groups Embrace Climate Pragmatism

Report cites controversial mining firms

Report cites controversial mining firms

Santiago, Chile (UPI) Mar 22, 2012
The world's most controversial mining companies are named - and shamed - in a report comparing their performance against U.N. and other environmental, social and governance principles. Environmental dangers from mining operations in both emerging markets and developed countries gained new prominence with growing controversy over fracking - demolition of whole stretches of mountains a

Engineers enlist weather model to optimize offshore wind plan

Engineers enlist weather model to optimize offshore wind plan

Stanford CA (SPX) Mar 23, 2012
Politics aside, most energy experts agree that cheap, clean, renewable wind energy holds great potential to help the world satisfy energy needs while reducing harmful greenhouse gases. Wind farms placed offshore could play a large role in meeting such challenges, and yet no offshore wind farms exist today in the United States.

Study finds room to store CO2 underground

Study finds room to store CO2 underground

Boston MA (SPX) Mar 23, 2012
A new study by researchers at MIT shows that there is enough capacity in deep saline aquifers in the United States to store at least a century's worth of carbon dioxide emissions from the nation's coal-fired powerplants. Though questions remain about the economics of systems to capture and store such gases, this study addresses a major issue that has overshadowed such proposals.

New Discoveries for Carbon Capture and Storage

New Discoveries for Carbon Capture and Storage

Climate change is generally attributed to carbon emissions, and efforts to reduce carbon emissions tend to focus on clean energy sources such as wind or solar power. However despite the advances in clean energy sources many believe that humanities greenhouse gas emissions are so vast that these technologies can no longer help solve the problem on their own. A new MIT study led by Ruben Juanes, the ARCO Associate Professor in Energy Studies in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has proven that there is enough capacity in deep…Read more...

US May Hold Large Reserves of Shale Oil, but is it Economically Out of Reach?

US May Hold Large Reserves of Shale Oil, but is it Economically Out of Reach?

There is a lot of talk recently that "tight oil" as found in North Dakota's Bakken and other shales in the Southwest will save America from stagnant global oil production and increasing gasoline prices. The current glut of natural gas which has brought prices to a 10-year low has forced companies drilling for gas to curtail their activity and move the crews and rigs to North Dakota and Texas where money can still be made in drilling for shale oil. New well completions in North Dakota are expected to surge again this year. A recent pronouncement…Read more...

Pulsed Injection can Increase the Amount of Recoverable Oil in a Well by 10%

Pulsed Injection can Increase the Amount of Recoverable Oil in a Well by 10%

When oil fields start to age and their production reduces, there is little that can be done. Generally oil remains within the well, however it is unreachable, due to it being trapped within difficult rock formations. Oil companies tasked with extracting additional oil from aging wells used to inject fluids into the rock to mix with the oil and drive it out for easier extraction in a process known as secondary recovery. However there is a major drawback to this approach which prevents it from being very effective. The fluids tend to follow the path…Read more...

Latin America's Clean Energy Investment Opportunities

Latin America's Clean Energy Investment Opportunities

Brazil, Nicaragua and Panama have been ranked the most attractive countries for clean energy investments in Latin America and the Caribbean by Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) and the Multilateral Investment Fund. The partnership has developed Climatescope – a review of the environment for low-carbon in the region, ranking 26 countries on their climate policies, the availability of climate finance, low-carbon businesses and clean-energy value chains, as well as their greenhouse gas management activities.Brazil, the world’s fifth…Read more...

Tom Murphy Interview: Resource Depletion is a Bigger Threat than Climate Change

Tom Murphy Interview: Resource Depletion is a Bigger Threat than Climate Change

Rising geopolitical tensions and high oil prices are continuing to help renewable energy find favour amongst investors and politicians. Yet how much faith should we place in renewables to make up the shortfall in fossil fuels? Can science really solve our energy problems, and which sectors offers the best hope for our energy future?To help us get to the bottom of this we spoke with energy specialist Dr. Tom Murphy, an associate professor of physics at the University of California. Tom runs the popular energy blog Do the Math which takes an astrophysicist’s-eye…Read more...

Obama hits back at energy policy critics

Obama hits back at energy policy critics
http://link.ft.com/r/BLH300/ZGYUMF/WL1GSD/YBZ0YY/ZGIAFS/LE/h?a1=2012&a2=3&a3=23
Obama signals support for oil pipeline
http://link.ft.com/r/BLH300/ZGYUMF/WL1GSD/YBZ0YY/FKBJV0/LE/h?a1=2012&a2=3&a3=23

 

Stop the politics and adopt a national energy plan
http://link.ft.com/r/BLH300/ZGYUMF/WL1GSD/YBZ0YY/30S5U1/LE/h?a1=2012&a2=3&a3=23

"Would You Like Sugar and Fat with That?"

"Would You Like Sugar and Fat with That?" -- Tracie McMillan, author of "The American Way of Eating," goes undercover in grocery stores, restaurants and the country's agricultural fields to find out why it's so hard for us to eat healthy food.
http://www.truthdig.com/arts_culture/item/would_you_like_sugar_and_fat_with_that_20120322/

From PennEnergy: This Week's Most Popular Oil & Gas News

This Week's Most Popular Oil & Gas News
Woodside Pluto LNG project ready to kick-off production
Petroleum demand falls 2.3 percent
Estimated $2 trillion oil production from Permian Basin
Americans believe benefits of natural gas outweigh risk
Valero suspends refining at Aruba
Shale gas production sharing contract for CNPC, Shell in China
New oil discovery in the Santos Basin Pre-salt
Global oil supplies stretched by Chinese demand
Marcellus Shale acquisition runs $2.5B for Williams
Europa withdraws from Cuejdiu license in Romania

Eco News Saline aquifers can store century's worth of CO2 emissions

Eco News

Thursday, March 22, 2012

Seismic survey at the Mariana trench will follow water dragged down into the Earth's mantle

Seismic survey at the Mariana trench will follow water dragged down into the Earth's mantle
(PhysOrg.com) -- Last month, Doug Wiens, PhD, professor of earth and planetary science at Washington University in St. Louis, was cruising the tropical waters of the western Pacific above the Mariana trench aboard the research vessel Thomas G. Thompson.

Earth's crust slowly being destroyed

Earth's crust slowly being destroyed
(PhysOrg.com) -- New research shows that the Earth’s crust is now undergoing high rates of destruction.

International study estimates ocean value

International study estimates ocean value
Professor Robert Diaz of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, is a co-editor of "Valuing the Ocean" a major new study by an international team of scientists and economists that attempts to measure the ocean's monetary value and to tally the costs and savings associated with human decisions affecting ocean health.

Small clique of nations found to dominate global trading web of food, water

Small clique of nations found to dominate global trading web of food, water
It's not easy, or economically feasible, to ship freshwater across the globe. But when scientists use food as a proxy for that water - taking into account how much crops are irrigated and livestock are fed - they can get a glimpse of the flow of freshwater between countries. When one research group studied this "virtual water network," they found that the interconnectedness between countries has almost doubled over the last two decades - potentially lending some resiliency to the water trade. Still, a handful of nations control a majority of the freshwater flow, and some regions, including much of Africa, are left out of the trading loop.

Obama Now Scrambles To Approve Transcanada Pipeline... Or At Least Half Of It; Environmentalists Furious from zero hedge by Tyler Durden

Obama Now Scrambles To Approve Transcanada Pipeline... Or At Least Half Of It; Environmentalists Furious

Obama seen 'pulling a fast one' with pipeline photo op

Obama seen 'pulling a fast one' with pipeline photo op
Obama seen 'pulling a fast one' with pipeline photo op
On Thursday, President Obama will travel to Cushing, Okla., to announce that he is speeding up the permit process for the southern section of the Keystone XL pipeline — which does not connect to Canada. “The problem is, we don’t need any presidential approval for that," says Rep. John Sullivan, R-Okla. "It doesn’t cross any international lines." Read & Comment

U.S. intel: Water may be next tool of terrorism

U.S. intel: Water may be next tool of terrorism
U.S. intel: Water may be next tool of terrorism
Beyond 2022, the use of water as a weapon of war or a tool of terrorism will become more likely, particularly in South Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, U.S. intelligence agencies said in a report released Thursday. Read & Comment

Why spring is blooming marvelous (and climate change makes it earlier)

Why spring is blooming marvelous (and climate change makes it earlier)

Norwich, UK (SPX) Mar 23, 2012
With buds bursting early, only for a mild winter to turn Arctic and wipe them out, we are witnessing how warm weather can trigger flowering, even out of season, and how important it is for plants to blossom at the right time of year. BBSRC-funded scientists have unpicked why temperature has such a powerful affect on how plants flower. In research to be published in the journal Nature, scie

New dataset provides 40 year record of CO2 accumulation in the surface ocean

New dataset provides 40 year record of CO2 accumulation in the surface ocean

Norwich UK (SPX) Mar 23, 2012
The most comprehensive dataset of surface water carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the world's oceans and coastal seas is launched last week by an international team of scientists led by the University of East Anglia (UEA). The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) comprises 6.3 million global observations made from research vessels, commercial ships and moorings around the world since 1968.

Corn insecticide linked to great die-off of beneficial honeybees

Corn insecticide linked to great die-off of beneficial honeybees

Washington DC (SPX) Mar 23, 2012
New research has linked springtime die-offs of honeybees critical for pollinating food crops - part of the mysterious malady called colony collapse disorder - with technology for planting corn coated with insecticides. The study, published in ACS' journal Environmental Science and Technology, appears on the eve of spring planting seasons in some parts of Europe where farmers use the techno

Atlanta’s Water War Is First in a Gathering Flood

Atlanta’s Water War Is First in a Gathering Flood

Peter Orszag looks at a dispute over water supplies in the southeastern United States to underscore the need for water policy reforms and greater infrastructure investment.

Little guy wins high court fight with EPA

'Little guy' wins high court fight with EPA
'Little guy' wins high court fight with EPA
In a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court on Wednesday gave an Idaho couple another chance to challenge a government ruling barring construction of their "dream house," an important property rights defeat for the Obama administration. "The Supreme Court has come to our rescue," Mike Sackett said, "and reminded the EPA — and everyone — that this is still America, and Americans still have rights under the Constitution." Read & Comment

Cold Snaps and Snowstorms: Evidence of Global Weirding?

By Dan Huber, March 22, 2012
NOAA recently declared this winter to be the 4th warmest on record for the contiguous United States. That sort of announcement might be expected in a warming world. But what about the relatively cold winters of 2009-2010 and 2010-2011, which featured historic blizzards in the Midwest and the East Coast? Florida had snow seven times in 2010! And while we Americans enjoyed a very mild winter this...  » Continue...

Quake Risk From Fracking Seen Cut With Disclosures, US Says

Quake Risk From Fracking Seen Cut With Disclosures, U.S. Says
Bloomberg
The Ohio Department of Natural Resources proposed this month creating rules for transporting and disposing of the fluids after concluding quakes last year were probably caused by water from oil and natural-gas drilling, know as fracking, being injected ...

Hydraulic Fracturing Related to Seismic Activity in Ohio


Hydraulic Fracturing Related to Seismic Activity in Ohio
GreenAnswers
By Almire Sidik on Thu, 03/22/2012 - 9:41am Hydraulic fracturing (aka fracking) has been linked to several earthquakes in the Youngstown, Ohio area starting in March, 2011. The earthquakes ranged in magnitude from 2.1 to 4.0, with a 4.0 quake occurring ...

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Amount of coldest Antarctic water near ocean floor decreasing for decades

Amount of coldest Antarctic water near ocean floor decreasing for decades
(PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists have found a large reduction in the amount of the coldest deep ocean water, called Antarctic Bottom Water, all around the Southern Ocean using data collected from 1980 to 2011. These findings, in a study now online, will likely stimulate new research on the causes of this change.

Chemical pollution in Europe's seas: The monitoring must catch up with the science

Chemical pollution in Europe's seas: The monitoring must catch up with the science
According to a recent poll of more than 10,000 citizens from ten European countries, pollution is the primary concern of the public at large among all issues that threaten the marine environment. A new position paper of the Marine Board-ESF shows that such public concern is not misplaced and is supported by scientific evidence.

Ocean climate change damage to cost $2 trillion

Ocean climate change damage to cost $2 trillion
Greenhouse gases are likely to result in annual costs of nearly $2 trillion in damage to the oceans by 2100, according to a new Swedish study

Focus on technology overlooks human behavior when addressing climate change

Focus on technology overlooks human behavior when addressing climate change

Technology alone won't help the world turn away from fossil fuel-based energy sources, says a sociologist. A shift in political and economic policies to is needed to embrace the concept that continued growth in energy consumption is not sustainable, experts say.

One solution to global overfishing found

One solution to global overfishing found

A new study indicates that "co-management" -- a collaborative arrangement between local communities, conservation groups, and governments -- provides one solution to a vexing global problem: overfishing.

Greenhouse gas can find a home underground

Greenhouse gas can find a home underground

A new study shows that there is enough capacity in deep saline aquifers in the United States to store at least a century's worth of carbon dioxide emissions from the nation's coal-fired powerplants. Though questions remain about the economics of systems to capture and store such gases, this study addresses a major issue that has overshadowed such proposals.

New method for cleaning up nuclear waste

New method for cleaning up nuclear waste

A new crystalline compound can be tailored to safely absorb radioactive ions from nuclear waste streams, experts say.

The new gatekeepers: reducing research misconduct from Nature News Blog by Brendan Maher

The new gatekeepers: reducing research misconduct

Sustainable Energy Choices for the 21st Century

Sustainable Energy Choices for the 21st Century http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98frSed0F5s

Spring Arrives with Equinox Tuesday, Earliest in More Than a Century Scientific American


Spring Arrives with Equinox Tuesday, Earliest in More Than a Century Scientific American

Marcellius Shale acquisition runs $2.5 billion for Williams

Marcellus Shale acquisition runs $2.5 billion for Williams
The company is also planning a joint venture in the Utica shale region.
Full Article

Natural gas fractionators to be constructed by Enterprise

Forward to Friend Natural gas fractionators to be constructed by Enterprise
Enterprise has announced plans to construct two more natural gas liquid fractionators at its Mont Belvieu, Texas complex.

Shale gas production sharing contract for CNPC and Shell

Shale gas production sharing contract for CNPC and Shell
The companies have signed a Production Sharing Contract for shale gas exploration, development and production in the Sichuan Basin, China.
Full Article

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

CDC study shows outbreaks linked to imported foods increasing

CDC study shows outbreaks linked to imported foods increasing

Washington DC (SPX) Mar 20, 2012
Foodborne disease outbreaks caused by imported food appeared to rise in 2009 and 2010, and nearly half of the outbreaks implicated foods imported from areas which previously had not been associated with outbreaks, according to research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, presented at the International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases in Atlanta.

Fracking Can Cause Air Pollution, Too

Fracking Can Cause Air Pollution, Too

Mary Duenwald, Bloomberg
Complaints about the potential bad environmental effects of hydraulic fracturing have centered on water contamination. But fracking can also affect the air -- particularly during the period when the wells are being built. .

Clean Energy Can Easily Replace Coal

Clean Energy Can Easily Replace Coal

Silvio Marcacci, CleanTechnica
Regional transmissions organizations (RTO) may be the most important factor that you've never heard of in America's shift toward a clean energy future.

Cap and Trade Programs Do Not Provide Sufficient Incentives for Energy Technology Innovation

Cap and Trade Programs Do Not Provide Sufficient Incentives for Energy Technology Innovation

Berkeley CA (SPX) Mar 21, 2012
Cap and trade programs to reduce emissions do not inherently provide incentives to induce the private sector to develop innovative technologies to address climate change, according to a new study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Exelon Energy Completes Insulator Upgrades at Byron Plant

Exelon Energy Completes Insulator Upgrades at Byron Plant

Exelon Energy has completed upgrades at Byron Generating Station and resumed operations late Sunday night, according to a release.
“Our team did a fantastic job of safely making robust upgrades to our facility that will ensure the safe and reliable operation of both units through the summer months and beyond,” said Byron Station Site Vice President Tim Tulon.
Plant officials say the upgrades should prevent future Unusual Events like the failed insulator that caused a loss of power in Unit 1 in late February. Also, in January, a similar event occurred in the Unit 2 switchyard.

Study confirms oil from Deepwater Horizon disaster enetered food chain in the Gulf of Mexico

Study confirms oil from Deepwater Horizon disaster entered food chain in the Gulf of Mexico
Since the explosion on the BP Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, scientists have been working to understand the impact that this disaster has had on the environment. For months, crude oil gushed into the water at a rate of approximately 53,000 barrels per day before the well was capped on July 15, 2010. A new study confirms that oil from the Macondo well made it into the ocean's food chain through the tiniest of organisms, zooplankton.

NOAA science supports New York's offshore energy planning

NOAA science supports New York's offshore energy planning
A newly released NOAA study will help New York state officials make advances in managing their coastal waters and guiding future development of offshore wind energy projects.

Unexpected eqrthquakes within continental plates pose challenges

Unexpected earthquakes within continental plates pose challenges
Earthquakes that occur on "passive" continental margins, such as the August 2011 magnitude 5.8 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake, surprise people because they expect earthquakes to occur only on plate boundaries. But, in fact, large and damaging intraplate earthquakes occur fairly regularly on passive margins around the world. For instance, in North America the approximately magnitude 7 Charleston earthquake shook South Carolina in 1886, causing severe damage and about 60 deaths, and the 1929 magnitude 7.2 earthquake on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, Canada, caused a tsunami, a large landslide, and 28 fatalities.

A New Climate Coalition: The Good and the Problematic

By Robert Stowe, March 20, 2012
On February 16, 2012, U.S. Secretary of State Hilary Clinton and environment ministers from five other countries introduced the Climate and Clean Air Coalition to Reduce Short-Lived Climate Pollutants. The Coalition’s members are the governments of Bangladesh, Canada, Ghana, Mexico, Sweden, and the United States, with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) serving as secretariat. (UNEP...  » Continue...

Monday, March 19, 2012

Study shows air emissions near fracking sites may impact health

Study shows air emissions near fracking sites may impact health
In a new study, researchers from the Colorado School of Public Health have shown that air pollution caused by hydraulic fracturing or fracking may contribute to acute and chronic health problems for those living near natural gas drilling sites.

Global sea level likely to rise as much as 70 feet for future generations

Global sea level likely to rise as much as 70 feet for future generations

March 19, 2012
Even if humankind manages to limit global warming to 2 degrees C (3.6 degrees F), as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recommends, future generations will have to deal with sea levels 12 to 22 meters (40 to 70 feet) higher than at present, according to research published in the journal Geology.

Is Water a Barrier to a Low-Carbon Energy Future?

Is Water a Barrier to a Low-Carbon Energy Future?

Ask an expert on clean tech what the largest barriers to a low carbon energy future are, and chances are they will list higher technology costs, policy barriers, or the need for new infrastructure to accommodate novel energy sources.

Will Renewables Help Glean Us Off of Fossil Fuels?

Will Renewables Help Glean Us Off of Fossil Fuels?

Where does energy come from, and what do we do with it?  Here is a great visual to start with, which was put together by the US Energy Information Administration:So, what is this telling us?

Nitrate in drinking water poses health risks for rural Californians

Nitrate in drinking water poses health risks for rural Californians

Davis CA (SPX) Mar 19, 2012
One in 10 people living in California's most productive agricultural areas is at risk for harmful levels of nitrate contamination in their drinking water, according to a report released by the University of California, Davis. The report was commissioned by the California State Water Resources Control Board. "Cleaning up nitrate in groundwater is a complex problem with no single solution,"

“Climate and Energy Policy in the Obama Administration” -- Pace Law School

“Climate and Energy Policy in the Obama Administration” -- Pace Law School

The 2012 Pace Law School Lloyd K Garrison Lecture will feature Professor Jody Freeman speaking on “Climate and Energy Policy in the Obama Administration”

Date:
March 26, 2012, 5:00 pm
 
Place:
Pace Law School 
Robert B. Fleming Moot Courtroom


Jody Freeman is the Archibald Cox Professor of Law and Director, Environmental Law Program, Harvard Law School.

Warming of 2 degrees inevitable over Canada

Warming of 2 degrees inevitable over Canada

Burnaby, Canada (SPX) Mar 19, 2012
Even if zero emissions of greenhouse gases were to be achieved, the world's temperature would continue to rise by about a quarter of a degree over a decade. That's a best-case scenario, according to a paper co-written by a Simon Fraser University researcher

End of Winter: How 2012 Snow Stack Up

End of Winter: How 2012 Snow Stack Up

Greenbelt, MD (SPX) Mar 19, 2012
The mild winter of 2012 has many people asking, "Where's the snow?" These two snow cover maps show the difference between snow extent on March 3, 2011, and March 5, 2012. The maps were compiled from data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite.

Greenland ice sheet may melt completely with 1.6 degrees global warming

Greenland ice sheet may melt completely with 1.6 degrees global warming

Potsdam, Germany (SPX) Mar 19, 2012
The Greenland ice sheet is likely to be more vulnerable to global warming than previously thought. The temperature threshold for melting the ice sheet completely is in the range of 0.8 to 3.2 degrees Celsius global warming, with a best estimate of 1.6 degrees above pre-industrial levels, shows a new study by scientists from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) and the Universi

Air emissions rules could cause slowdown in drilling

Air emissions rules could cause slowdown in drilling
The New Source Performance Standards for oil and natural gas production proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency would significantly slowdown drilling, according to a new study funded by the American Petroleum Institute.
Full Article

Sunday, March 18, 2012

Fracking: Pennsylvania Gags Physicians

Fracking: Pennsylvania Gags Physicians

A new Pennsylvania law endangers public health by forbidding health care professionals from sharing information they learn about certain chemicals and procedures used in high volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing. The procedure is commonly known as fracking.

Near-miss asteroid will return next year, even closer

Near-miss asteroid will return next year, even closer

When it whizzes past Earth in 2013, a newly discovered asteroid is going to miss our planet -- but not by much. The 50-meter space rock is expected to come closer than many satellites, highlighting the growing need to keep watch on hazards from above.

Increase in Arctic shipping is risk to marine mammals

Increase in Arctic shipping is risk to marine mammals

A rapid increase in shipping in the formerly ice-choked waterways of the Arctic poses a significant increase in risk to the region’s marine mammals and the local communities that rely on them for food security and cultural identity, according to experts.

Glacier-fed river systems threatened by climate change

Glacier-fed river systems threatened by climate change

As glaciers vanish due to global warming, so will those species dependent upon the icy runoff.

Invasive plants: Climate is a determining factor

Invasive plants: Climate is a determining factor

Most invasive plants colonize regions with climates similar to the one from their native areas. With the analysis of fifty invasive plant species introduced worldwide, this study confirms that it is possible, for the most part, to predict the regions of potential invasibility based on the principle of climatic niche conservation.

'Gravity is climate': 10 years of climate research satellites GRACE

'Gravity is climate': 10 years of climate research satellites GRACE

For the first time, the melting of glaciers in Greenland can now be measured with high accuracy from space. A new sharp image also renders the spatial distribution of the glacial melt more precisely.

A Levy on an Underground Bonanza

A Levy on an Underground Bonanza

Penelope Lemov, Governing

Royal Dutch's Dangerous Shell Game

Royal Dutch's Dangerous Shell Game

Michael Brune, Huffington Post
Royal Dutch Shell, the fifth-largest company in the world, is suing the Sierra Club along with a dozen other environmental organizations on the off chance that we might attempt to do our job. Shell is taking us to court preemptively because we might have the audacity to say that drilling in the Arctic is risky and unsafe. . .

EPA Rule Should Allow Site-Specific Analysis of Power Plant Cooling Systems

EPA Rule Should Allow Site-Specific Analysis of Power Plant Cooling Systems

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is considering revisions to regulations implementing Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act that could require hundreds of power plants to build cooling towers.  The electric utility sector encourages EPA to recognize site-specific circumstances, consider costs and benefits, allow site-specific assessments, and account for impacts to the ecosystem and the national energy supply.

EPA Proposed Section 316(b) Regulation Governing Power Plant Cooling Water Systems Includes Positive Features But Still Needs Significant Improvement

EPA Proposed Section 316(b) Regulation Governing Power Plant Cooling Water Systems Includes Positive Features But Still Needs Significant Improvement

Small Reactor Development Advances Energy, Environmental Benefits in New Markets

Small Reactor Development Advances Energy, Environmental Benefits in New Markets

Small-scale reactors can complement large nuclear plant projects by expanding potential markets in the United States and abroad for carbon-free energy production. Smaller reactors provide energy companies and other users with additional options that help achieve critical energy and environmental policies.

Remember Fukushima: Presenting The Radioactive Seawater Impact Map

Remember Fukushima: Presenting The Radioactive Seawater Impact Map

A few days after the one year anniversary of the Fukushima disaster, nobody talks about it anymore. After all it's "fixed", and if it isn't, the Fed will fix it. Remember in the New Normal nothing bad is allowed the happen. So for those who have forgotten, here is a reminder.
From ASR, a global coastal and marine consulting firm, The Radioactive Seawater Impact Map

On Slime and Water from zero hedge by Bruce Krasting

On Slime and Water

The REAL Cause of the Global Obesity Epidemic

The REAL Cause of the Global Obesity Epidemic

By Washington's Blog
World Wide Obesity Epidemic

2011 - The Year Of The Earthquake: A Visual And Auditory Guide from zero hedge by Tyler Durden

2011 - The Year Of The Earthquake: A Visual And Auditory Guide

WSU News Center - Ohio earthquakes raise concern over 'fracking'

WSU News Center - Ohio earthquakes raise concern over 'fracking'
PULLMAN, Wash. - The solid earth is riddled with faults. Each fault is a plane of weakness in the rocks that make up the outer rind of the Earth. Some of those ...
news.wsu.edu/pages/publications.asp?Action=Detail...