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Saturday, April 7, 2012

Unregulated Fracking for Decades? Why California May Be a Disaster Waiting to Happen

It appears fracking has gone virtually unregulated in California for decades and now lawmakers are pushing back with legislation to expose the truth.

Why Do We Pay Energy Giants to Wreck Earth?

Why Do We Pay Energy Giants to Wreck Earth?

We must stop subsidizing the fossil-fuel industry.

Frackers Outbid Farmers For Water in Colorado Drought

Frackers Outbid Farmers For Water in Colorado Drought

Colorado's hydrofracking boom — a technology that heavily relies on water — only adds additional strain as farmers and drillers bid for a scarce resource.

Debating the Future of Our World's Water

Debating the Future of Our World's Water

Achieving water democracy is surely a terrific opportunity to fix governance problems from the local to the global, but it's one enormous task.

Lakotas Launch Hunger Strike Against Tar Sands Pipelines

Posted: 07 Apr 2012 12:16 AM PDT
In the Dakotas, members of the proud Lakota Nation rose in protest this week to join a  48-hour hunger strike in opposition to the Keystone XL pipeline—and all tar sands pipelines—they say will destroy precious water resources and ancestral lands in the U.S and in Canada. 

Middle America Is Experiencing a Massive Increase in 3.0+ Earthquakes


Middle America Is Experiencing a Massive Increase in 3.0+ Earthquakes
The Atlantic
The conclusion that at least one environmental group has drawn from this data is that fracking, in one way or another, has caused these earthquakes. The Environmental Working Group notes that more than 400000 wells were drilled between 2001 and 2010, ...
See all stories on this topic »

Friday, April 6, 2012

Algae Is Not Endive: The Future of Biofuels in the United States

Algae Is Not Endive: The Future of Biofuels in the United States


http://www.theglobalist.com/StoryId.aspx?StoryId=9581

USGS: Recent Earthquakes “Almost Certainly Manmade”


USGS: Recent Earthquakes “Almost Certainly Manmade”
Environmental Working Group
By Dusty Horwitt and Alex Formuzis, April 2012 Washington, DC – A US Geological Survey research team has linked oil and natural gas drilling operations to a series of recent earthquakes from Alabama to the Northern Rockies. According to the study led ...
See all stories on this topic »

Shale Shocked: 'Remarkable Increase' In U.S. Earthquakes 'Almost Certainly ...

Shale Shocked: 'Remarkable Increase' In U.S. Earthquakes 'Almost Certainly ...
ThinkProgress
As hydraulic fracturing has exploded onto the scene, it has increasingly been connected to earthquakes. Some quakes may be caused by the original fracking — that is, by injecting a fluid mixture into the earth to release natural gas (or oil).

Growing Food Demand Strains Energy, Water Supplies


Growing Food Demand Strains Energy, Water Supplies
National Geographic
Excessive water pumping has strained both water and energy supplies in India, China and other hot spots around the world. Photograph by Anupam Nath, Associated Press The northern region of Gujarat State in western India (map) is semi-arid and prone to ...

Five Iconic Mountains Threatened By Climate Change


Posted: 06 Apr 2012 07:27 AM PDT
Glacial melt. Invasive species. Mudslides. Erosion. Mountains around the world are seeing major changes accelerated by a warming planet.

Thursday, April 5, 2012

New USGS Report Links Fracking and Earthquakes

New USGS Report Links Fracking and Earthquakes
Triple Pundit
The paper will directly link an “unprecedented” increase in frequency and magnitude of earthquakes to drilling for oil and gas. This link is not a new one. The USGS already linked about 50 earthquakes in Oklahoma due to fracking.

Coldest antarctic water said disappearing

Coldest antarctic water said disappearing

Seattle (UPI) Apr 4, 2012
The amount of coldest deep ocean water in the Southern Ocean, called Antarctic Bottom Water, has been decreasing for decades, researchers say. Oceanographers from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Washington said Antarctic Bottom Water has been disappearing at an average rate of almost 9 million tons per second over the past few decades

ESA and NASA join forces to measure Arctic sea ice

ESA and NASA join forces to measure Arctic sea ice

Paris (ESA) Apr 05, 2012
Marking another remarkable collaborative effort, ESA and NASA met up over the Arctic Ocean this week to perform some carefully coordinated flights directly under CryoSat orbiting above. The data gathered help ensure the accuracy of ESA's ice mission.

Thawing permafrost may have led to extreme global warming events

Thawing permafrost may have led to extreme global warming events

Sheffield UK (SPX) Apr 05, 2012
Scientists analysing prehistoric global warming say thawing permafrost released massive amounts of carbon stored in frozen soil of Polar Regions exacerbating climate change through increasing global temperatures and ocean acidification.

China's grain at risk from climate change

China's grain at risk from climate change

Beijing (UPI) Apr 3, 2012
China's agricultural security is at risk from climate change and the selling of arable lands. "Food security remains the weakest link in China's national economic security," Han Jun, deputy director of the State Council's Development Research Center told China Daily. Seeds, water and land, he says, will be essential to China's further development in agriculture.

Poland to ban Monsanto's GM maize

Poland to ban Monsanto's GM maize by Staff Writers Warsaw (AFP) April 4, 2012


Poland will impose a complete ban on growing the MON810 genetically modified strain of maize made by US company Monsanto on its territory, Agriculture Minister Marek Sawicki said Wednesday.
"The decree is in the works. It introduces a complete ban on the MON810 strain of maize in Poland," Sawicki told reporters, adding that pollen of this strain could have a harmful effect on bees.

Defying conventional wisdom, water can float on oil

Defying conventional wisdom, water can float on oil

Defying thousands of years of conventional wisdom, scientists are reporting that it is possible for water to float on oil, a discovery they say has important potential applications in cleaning up oil spills that threaten seashores and fisheries.

Satellite observes rapid ice shelf disintegration in Antarctic

Satellite observes rapid ice shelf disintegration in Antarctic

As ESA’s Envisat satellite continues to observe the rapid retreat of one of Antarctica’s ice shelves due to climate warming. One of the satellite’s first observations following its launch on 1 March 2002 was of break-up of a main section of the Larsen B ice shelf in Antarctica – when 3200 sq km of ice disintegrated within a few days due to mechanical instabilities of the ice masses triggered by climate warming.

Offshore structures in harsh ocean environments studied

Offshore structures in harsh ocean environments studied
The Research & Development Corporation of Newfoundland and Labrador and ABS of Texas have announced a combined $600,000 investment for the ABS Harsh Environment Technology Center and associated research program.
Full Article

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Monsanto Threatens to Sue Vermont if Legislators Pass a Bill Requiring GMO Food to Be Labeled

Monsanto Threatens to Sue Vermont if Legislators Pass a Bill Requiring GMO Food to Be Labeled

What it really comes down to this: Elected officials are abandoning the public interest and public will in the face of corporate intimidation.

2 Years After Upper Big Branch Disaster, Coal Baron Blankenship Is Gone. What Else Has Changed?

2 Years After Upper Big Branch Disaster, Coal Baron Blankenship Is Gone. What Else Has Changed?

As families of dead miners mark the second anniversary of the Upper Big Branch Mine disaster, there is little consolation in the way of improved safety laws or reforms.

Peter Kareiva, An Inconvenient Environmentalist

Peter Kareiva, An Inconvenient Environmentalist

Andrew Revkin, NYT
I encourage you to watch the provocative and important lecture above by Peter Kareiva, the chief scientist of the world's biggest environmental group, the Nature Conservancy. The title is Failed Metaphors and A New Environmentalism for the 21st Century.  It's a refreshing call for new approaches from a community stuck on what I've called woe is me, shame on you

10,000 simulations show warming range of 1.4 to 3 degrees by 2050

10,000 simulations show warming range of 1.4 to 3 degrees by 2050

A project running almost 10,000 climate simulations on volunteers' home computers has found that a global warming of 3 degrees Celsius by 2050 is 'equally plausible' as a rise of 1.4 degrees.

New report on the state of polar regions

New report on the state of polar regions

A new synthesis of reports from thousands of scientists in 60 countries who took part in the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-08, is the first in over 50 years to offer a benchmark for environmental conditions and new discoveries in the polar regions.

China's grain at risk from climate change

China's grain at risk from climate change

Beijing (UPI) Apr 3, 2012
China's agricultural security is at risk from climate change and the selling of arable lands. "Food security remains the weakest link in China's national economic security," Han Jun, deputy director of the State Council's Development Research Center told China Daily. Seeds, water and land, he says, will be essential to China's further development in agriculture

Gray seals consume as much fish as the fishing industry catches

Gray seals consume as much fish as the fishing industry catches

Gothenburg, Sweden (SPX) Apr 04, 2012
The grey seals in the Baltic Sea compete for fish with the fishing industry. The seals locally eat about the same quantities of cod, common whitefish, salmon, sea trout and eel as those taken by fishermen. This is the conclusion from research carried out at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. The grey seals in the Baltic Sea eat largely the same species and the same sizes of fish as thos

New comparison of ocean temperatures reveals rise over the last century

New comparison of ocean temperatures reveals rise over the last century

San Diego CA (SPX) Apr 04, 2012
A new study contrasting ocean temperature readings of the 1870s with temperatures of the modern seas reveals an upward trend of global ocean warming spanning at least 100 years. The research led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego physical oceanographer Dean Roemmich shows a .33-degree Celsius (.59-degree Fahrenheit) average increase in the upper portions of the ocean to
"Pro-fracking" documentary raises more than $185,000
"FrackNation" investigates health scares surrounding the process and often reveals a lack of scientific evidence to substantiate them.
Full Article

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Scientists track radioactive iodine in New Hampshire from Japan nuclear ...

Scientists track radioactive iodine in New Hampshire from Japan nuclear ...
Science Daily (press release)
ScienceDaily (Apr. 2, 2012) — Radioactive iodine found by Dartmouth researchers in the local New Hampshire environment is a direct consequence of a nuclear reactor's explosion and meltdown half a world away, says Joshua Landis, a research associate in ...

NOAA Looks at the Waters Near Fukushima Daiichi

NOAA Looks at the Waters Near Fukushima Daiichi

noaa_ship_450The American National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency sent a research vessel boat to Japan last April to study the waters near the Fukushima Daiichi facility and assess the impact of radioactive isotopes released into the water by the plant. The international team of researchers found isotopes of cesium, which was expected, and silver, which was not expected. (Radioactive silver has a half-life of 250 days).
The conclusion in the abstract: “Radiation risks due to these radionuclides are below those generally considered harmful to marine animals and human consumers, and even below those from naturally occurring radionuclides.”

Gulf of Mexico Dolphins Sick, Dying After BP Oil Spill

Gulf of Mexico Dolphins Sick, Dying After BP Oil Spill

The dolphins could have ingested oil from sediments or water while feeding or by eating whole fish, which can harbor toxic chemicals.

Why Europe's climate faces a stormy future

Why Europe's climate faces a stormy future
(PhysOrg.com) -- Europe is likely to be hit by more violent winter storms in the future. Now a new study into the effects of climate change has found out why.

Radioactive material from Fukushima nuclear reactor tracked 600 km away


Radioactive material from Fukushima nuclear reactor tracked 600 km away
Economic Times
The Fukushima nuclear plant was destroyed by a massive tsunami that wreaked havoc across the coastal Japan following a powerful quake on March 11, 2011. To find out how that radiation spread in the waters off Japan, the researchers in June released ...


New Data Show Fukushima Radiation Moved Rapidly Out Into Pacific Ocean
Voice of America
Three reactors at the Fukushima-1 nuclear power plant suffered core meltdowns last March after the area was hit by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake that triggered a massive tsunami. Scientists from Woods Hole, as well as Stony Brook University in New York ...

To Protect Americans' Health, NRDC Opposes Expanded Fracking until Stronger Safeguards Are in Place

Posted: 03 Apr 2012 11:24 AM PDT
Most people want their homes to be a safe haven where their families can grow and thrive. Yet for thousands of Americans who find themselves living next to natural gas drilling sites, that sense of safety is becoming harder to preserve. A new study by researchers from the Colorado School of Public Health found that air pollution near natural gas fracking sites increased the risk of significant health problems for people living near drill sites.

Studies show how common crop pesticide harms bees

Studies show how common crop pesticide harms bees

Washington DC (SPX) Apr 03, 2012
A pair of new studies reveals the multiple ways that a widely used insecticide harms bumblebees and honeybees. The reports, one by a U.K. team and one by a French team, appear online at the Science Express Web site of the journal Science, on 29 March, 2012

Monday, April 2, 2012

New comparison of ocean temperatures reveals rise over the last century

New comparison of ocean temperatures reveals rise over the last century

A new study contrasting ocean temperature readings of the 1870s with temperatures of the modern seas reveals an upward trend of global ocean warming spanning at least 100 years. The research shows a .33-degree Celsius (.59-degree Fahrenheit) average increase in the upper portions of the ocean to 700 meters (2,300 feet) depth. Modern data is derived from the international Argo program.

Sampling the Pacific for signs of Fukushima

Sampling the Pacific for signs of Fukushima

A recent research cruise has reported on the amount, spread, and impacts of radiation released into the ocean from the tsunami-crippled reactors in Fukushima, Japan. They studied ocean currents, and sampled water and marine organisms up to the edge of the exclusion zone around the reactors.

Exploring the Witch Hunt Against Hydraulic Fracturing

Exploring the Witch Hunt Against Hydraulic Fracturing

Natural gas production, from hydrocarbon rich shale formations, known as “shale gas,” is one of the most rapidly expanding trends in onshore oil and gas exploration and production today. A key element in the emergence of shale gas exploration has been the refinement of cost?effective horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies. These two processes, along with the implementation of protective Best Management Practices, have allowed shale gas development to move into areas that previously were not accessible. New gas developments…Read more...

The Slow Death of Carbon Policy

The Slow Death of Carbon Policy

In both the EU and the US carbon policy correctness has run its course having been discredited by scandal, the persistence of scientific method, and public pressure to recognize market realities. The proponents of carbon policy changes are caught between panic and despair. They came so close to implementing their policy regimes, and cannot now accept that the world has said ‘No!’ The evidence of the death rattle of carbon policy has been presenting itself for a while but like a degenerative disease it was slow to develop but relentless…Read more...

Little Fish, Big Impact -- Lenfest Ocean Program

Little Fish, Big Impact -- Lenfest Ocean Program

Little Fish, Big Impact an April 2012 report from the Lenfest Ocean Program of the Institute for Ocean Conservation Science at Stony Brook University finds that;

From the Summary
"Forage fish are small to medium-sized species that include anchovies, herring, menhaden, and sardines. Direct catch of forage fish makes up more than one-third of the world’s marine fish catch and has contributed to the collapse of some forage fish populations. In the most comprehensive global analysis of forage fish management to date, the Task Force found that conventional management can be risky for forage fish because it does not adequately account for their wide population swings and high catchability. It also fails to capture the critical role of forage fish as food for marine mammals, seabirds, and commercially important fish such as tuna, salmon, and cod. The report recommends cutting catch rates in half in many ecosystems and doubling the minimum biomass of forage fish that must be left in the water, compared to conventional management targets. Even more stringent measures are advised when important biological information is missing."

Agency stops seismic tests; worries about dolphins

Agency stops seismic tests; worries about dolphins
(AP) -- With sick and dead dolphins turning up along Louisiana's coast, federal regulators are curbing an oil and natural gas exploration company from doing seismic tests known to disturb marine mammals.

3/31/2012 -- Oklahoma 3.3M earthquake -- Fracking / Man Made

3/31/2012 -- Oklahoma 3.3M earthquake -- Fracking / Man Made ...
This is becoming a routine occurrence. Location: from USGS : 35.451°N, 96.590° W Several ...
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8MaS2C9_tY

US oil industry on slippery slope

US oil industry on slippery slope

The oil industry in the United States is seeking to eliminate virtually all environmental restraints to gain access to additional stores of oil and gas, and open vast tracts of coastal and wilderness areas to intensive drilling. Take the wrong path, and the US risks resembling a Third World petro-state - Michael T Klare

Editor's picks: March's Top Ten in Petroleum

Editor's picks: March's Top Ten in Petroleum
At the end of each month, PennEnergy’s editorial staff will present its top ten picks for the best industry content in the power and petroleum sectors.
Full Article

Wicked Tuna New Series Premieres Tonight at 10P

Wicked Tuna
New Series Premieres Tonight at 10P

In Gloucester, Massachusetts, there's a special breed of fishermen. For generations they've used rod and reel to catch the elusive bluefin tuna. They depend on these fish for their livelihood, and the competition is brutal. When one bluefin can bring in as much as $20,000 - they'll do whatever it takes to hook up.
http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/PS!epFTUxfxSzYFBgIAAAAGCgFICgkxMTQ1MzU3NTYKCjI5MzMwNzk3NzAJAG6jigoJNzA2NzM0NTE0BQ==

WICKED TUNA Premieres Tonight at 10P on National Geographic Channel

WICKED TUNA Premieres Tonight at 10P on National Geographic Channel

If you're having trouble viewing this email, see it on the Web <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/14d48914flayfousibrnmwvqaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa> .
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Wicked Tuna
<http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/1ae5ca51blayfousibrnmwvyaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa> New Series Premieres Tonight at 10P

In Gloucester, Massachusetts, there's a special breed of fishermen. For generations they've used rod and reel to catch the elusive bluefin tuna. They depend on these fish for their livelihood, and the competition is brutal. When one bluefin can bring in as much as $20,000 - they'll do whatever it takes to hook up.

Watch a Preview >>

Episode Guide >> <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/166e36f55layfousibrnmwwaaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>

Photo: Wicked Tuna <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/185f75b01layfousibrnmwwiaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>
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Photo: Bluefin Tuna Issues <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/17bba01bclayfousibrnmwwqaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>                Bluefin Tuna Issues <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/198ae35e8layfousibrnmwwyaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>
Bluefin tuna populations are at historic lows, and the world is debating how to save the species. Understand the issues behind this fish.


Photo: Conversation <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/18adb1c55layfousibrnmwxaaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>               Conversation <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/169cf2801layfousibrnmwxiaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>
When it comes to bluefin tuna, the issues are clear. The answers are not. Join the conversation and tell us what you think.


Photo: Wicked Tuna Lingo <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/1978272bclayfousibrnmwxqaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>          Learn the "Wicked Lingo" <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/1749646e8layfousibrnmwxyaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>
Hear all the Wicked-Tuna-isms you need to know, featuring audio examples by First Mate Paul.


Photo: Welcome to Gloucester <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/1bc298ca6layfousibrnmwyaaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>              Welcome to Gloucester <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/15f3db8f2layfousibrnmwyiaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>
Get the history of America's oldest fishing village, which was founded back in the early 1600s.
        Photo: Meet the Fishermen <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/1a170e24flayfousibrnmwyqaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>                Meet the Fishermen <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/14264d61blayfousibrnmwyyaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>  <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/1e73e3db3layfousibrnmwzaaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>
Meet the hardworking fishermen of Wicked Tuna who use the most selective rod and reel technique.


Photo: Online Resources <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/1042a09e7layfousibrnmwziaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>           Online Resources <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/1fa67535alayfousibrnmwzqaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>
Our online resource lists organizations that are active in the ongoing tuna debate and represent the interests of scientists, conservationists, fishermen, and industry.
 <http://images.bigfootinteractive.com/images/7110103/53232967/20120401_line.jpg> Wicked Tuna <http://newsletters.nationalgeographic.com/11973670elayfousibrnmwzyaaaaablwth3ncuh7jwiyaaaaa>


Copyright © 2012 National Geographic Society. All Rights Reserved.

EPA drops fracking suit against Texas driller

EPA drops fracking suit against Texas driller
EPA drops fracking suit against Texas driller
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency agreed to end a lawsuit that would have forced Range Resources Corp. to fix natural-gas wells the government said were contaminating water in Parker County, Texas. Read & Comment

New simulation predicts higher average Earth temperatures by 2050 than other models

New simulation predicts higher average Earth temperatures by 2050 than other models
(PhysOrg.com) -- Over the past several years, researchers have built a variety of computer simulations created to predict Earth’s climate in the future. Most recently, most models have suggested that over the next fifty years, we’ll see an average worldwide rise in temperature of perhaps 1°C. Now a new group of simulations, using the combined computing power of thousands of personal computers, says that number is too low, and that we might see temperatures rise as much as 3°C, which would of course, be a far more serious situation. The simulations, run by climateprediction.net in conjunction with the BBC Climate Change Experiment, resulted in predictions of a rise in temperature ranging from 1.4°C to 3.0°C by 2050. The large team involved in the project has published their findings in Nature Geoscience.

West Antarctic ice shelves tearing apart at the seams

West Antarctic ice shelves tearing apart at the seams
A new study examining nearly 40 years of satellite imagery has revealed that the floating ice shelves of a critical portion of West Antarctica are steadily losing their grip on adjacent bay walls, potentially amplifying an already accelerating loss of ice to the sea.

Sunday, April 1, 2012

EPA proposes First Carbon Pollution Standard


Message 1
From: U.S. EPA <usaepa@govdelivery.com>
Date: 03/27/2012
Subject: News Release: EPA Proposes First Carbon Pollution Standard for Future Power Plants/Achievable standard is in line with investments already being made and will inform the building of new plants moving forward
CONTACT:Cathy Milbourn (News Media Only)
Milbourn.cathy@epa.gov
202-564-7849
202-564-4355

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:March 27, 2012
EPA Proposes First Carbon Pollution Standard for Future Power Plants
Achievable standard is in line with investments already being made and will inform the building of new plants moving forward
WASHINGTON – Following a 2007 Supreme Court ruling, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today proposed the first Clean Air Act standard for carbon pollution from new power plants. EPA’s proposed standard reflects the ongoing trend in the power sector to build cleaner plants that take advantage of American-made technologies, including new, clean-burning, efficient natural gas generation, which is already the technology of choice for new and planned power plants. At the same time, the rule creates a path forward for new technologies to be deployed at future facilities that will allow companies to burn coal, while emitting less carbon pollution. The rulemaking proposed today only concerns new generating units that will be built in the future, and does not apply to existing units already operating or units that will start construction over the next 12 months.

“Today we’re taking a common-sense step to reduce pollution in our air, protect the planet for our children, and move us into a new era of American energy,” said EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson. “Right now there are no limits to the amount of carbon pollution that future power plants will be able to put into our skies – and the health and economic threats of a changing climate continue to grow. We’re putting in place a standard that relies on the use of clean, American made technology to tackle a challenge that we can’t leave to our kids and grandkids.”

Currently, there is no uniform national limit on the amount of carbon pollution new power plants can emit. As a direct result of the Supreme
Court’s 2007 ruling, EPA in 2009 determined that greenhouse gas pollution threatens Americans’ health and welfare by leading to long lasting changes in our climate that can have a range of negative effects on human health and the environment.   

The proposed standard, which only applies to power plants built in the future, is flexible and would help minimize carbon pollution through the deployment of the same types of modern technologies and steps that
power companies are already taking to build the next generation of power plants. EPA’s proposal is in line with these investments and will ensure that this progress toward a cleaner, safer and more modern power sector continues. The proposed standards can be met by a range of power facilities burning different fossil fuels, including natural gas technologies that are already widespread, as well as coal with technologies to reduce carbon emissions. Even without today’s action, the power plants that are currently projected to be built going forward would already comply with the standard. As a result, EPA does not project additional cost for industry to comply with this standard. 

Prior to developing this standard, EPA engaged in an extensive and open public process to gather the latest information to aid in developing a carbon pollution standard for new power plants.
The agency is seeking additional comment and information, including public hearings, and will take that input fully into account as it completes the rulemaking process. EPA’s comment period will be open for 60 days following publication in the Federal Register.

More information:
http://epa.gov/carbonpollutionstandard/
R045



Message 2
From: U.S. EPA <usaepa@govdelivery.com>
Date: 03/27/2012
Subject: News Release: Media Alert: EPA to Hold Media Conference Call on Clean Air Act
CONTACT:Cathy Milbourn (News Media Only)
Milbourn.cathy@epa.gov
202-564-7849
202-564-4355

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:March 27, 2012
Media Alert: EPA to Hold Media Conference Call on Clean Air Act
WASHINGTON
– EPA will hold a media conference call at noon Eastern Daylight Time to discuss an important Clean Air Act initiative.

WHAT:
Media teleconference on Clean Air Act Announcement

WHO: Lisa P. Jackson, EPA Administrator

WHEN: Tuesday, March 27, 2012, noon, Eastern Daylight Time

HOW: To participate, please use the following dial-in numbers

Call-in:
(888)--539-8821 (Toll Free for U.S. and Canada)

Conference ID: 66493630
*** FOR CREDENTIALLED NEWS MEDIA ONLY***
***Participants must provide their name (first and last), affiliation, and email address***

***PLEASE DIAL IN 10 MINUTES BEFORE START OF THE CALL***

R044







Message 3
From: U.S. EPA <usaepa@govdelivery.com>
Date: 03/27/2012
Subject: News Release: Statements on EPA’s Proposed Carbon Pollution Standard for New Power Plants
CONTACT:Cathy Milbourn (News Media Only)
Milbourn.cathy@epa.gov
202-564-7849
202-564-4355

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
March 27, 2012

Statements on EPA’s Proposed Carbon Pollution Standard for New Power Plants
WASHINGTON -- Following a 2007 Supreme Court ruling, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today proposed the first Clean Air Act standard for carbon pollution from new power plants. EPA’s proposed standard reflects the ongoing trend in the power sector to build cleaner plants that take advantage of American-made technologies, including new, clean-burning, efficient natural gas generation, which is already the technology of choice for new and planned power plants. At the same time, the rule creates a path forward for new technologies to be deployed at future facilities that will allow companies to burn coal, while emitting less carbon pollution. The rulemaking proposed today only concerns new generating units that will be built in the future, and does not apply to existing units already operating or units that will start construction over the next 12 months. Here’s what people across the country are saying about EPA’s proposed carbon pollution standard for new power plants:

John Arensmeyer, CEO, Small Business Majority:
“…National opinion polling we released in September found 76 percent of small business owners support the EPA regulating carbon emissions under the Clean Air Act. Another 87 percent believe improving innovation and energy efficiency are good ways to increase prosperity for small businesses…”

Albert A. Rizzo, M.D., Chair, Board of Directors of the American Lung Association: “…By proposing standards for carbon pollution from new facilities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is setting the stage for the next generation of America’s power plants to be the least toxic and most modern in the world…”

The Clean Energy Group’s Clean Air Policy Initiative:“…EPA’s action today represents a modest step that provides the industry with business and regulatory certainty… Further, based on our review of recent projections by the U.S. Energy Information Administration and current market dynamics, the proposed GHG performance standards for new sources will not impact the reliability of the electric system.”

Mindy S. Lubber, president of Ceres and director of the Investor Network on Climate Risk:“Ceres applauds the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for releasing, for public comment, its historic proposal to limit carbon pollution from new power plants under the Clean Air Act. Ceres supports this new standard because it will provide certainty to businesses and investors, clarify the risks and opportunities for the U.S. electric power sector, and serve as a long-term market signal to drive greater investment in lower-carbon electric power generation…”

Dick Munson, SVP, Recycled Energy Development:“The Environmental Protection Agency’s new rules on greenhouse-gas emissions will help U.S. businesses increase their productivity and competitiveness. By internalizing the costs of pollution, EPA has provided certainty to firms seeking to generate clean energy and increase manufacturing efficiency.”

Ralph Izzo, CEO, Public Service Electric and Gas:
“…The Agency’s action establishes a logical and modest standard for new electric power plants and provides the industry with much-needed regulatory certainty. The EPA provides a framework for the industry to confront this problem in a cost effective manner…”  

Sen. Tom Carper (D-Del.), Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Safety:“...Today’s proposal to ensure that new coal and natural gas power plants take into account their greenhouse gas emissions before they commence construction is a step in the right direction as we work to curb these harmful emissions...”

Bill Ritter Jr., Former Colorado Governor:“…It is welcome news, indeed, to see our nation moving forward with clean air standards to limit the harmful carbon pollution from new coal burning power plants as coal plants are the highest emitting source of air pollution in our country.  The proposed emission standards for carbon pollution will unleash smart investments in cleaner, homegrown energy that will limit dangerous pollution and build a modern clean energy economy for the 21st Century.”

Senator Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.):“The EPA took an important step today in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions with the release of the New Source Performance Standards…”

Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D- Calif.), Ranking Member, Committee on Energy and Commerce: “The proposal is a breakthrough. It sets achievable limits on dangerous carbon pollution, spurs investments in new clean energy technologies, and provides certainty for industry. And it shows the President is listening to scientists, not extremists who deny the existence of climate change. Today’s action will reduce pollution, make families healthier, promote innovation, and help us compete with China and other countries that are investing in clean energy.”

Rep. Ed Markey (D-Mass.), Ranking Member, Committee on Natural Resources:“…The Obama administration has already put us on the path towards emitting less pollution from our vehicle tailpipes, and now they are doing the same thing for America’s power plant smokestacks. Both efforts will spur a generation of American-built energy innovation, and help stave off the worse effects of climate change. This carbon standard is yet another indication that we need to keep America’s natural gas here at home to provide affordable electricity and capitalize on this competitive advantage to rebuild our manufacturing, chemical and fertilizer industries.”

American Sustainable Business Council, Environmental Entrepreneurs (E2) and Main Street Alliance:“…As representatives of the business community, we understand the importance of certainty and clear market signals and believe a national standard to reduce carbon pollution from new power plants will both clarify risks and opportunities for U.S. businesses, while also leading to technological innovation and investment in the domestic clean energy market.  Investing in cleaner technologies and more efficient resources can be a pathway to profit and prosperity, boosting economic growth and creating jobs while also providing competitive returns to investors.  We look forward to reviewing the proposal and identifying opportunities for increased investment in innovative low and no-carbon technologies as well as new energy infrastructure and energy efficiency…”

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Message 4
From: U.S. EPA <usaepa@govdelivery.com>
Date: 03/27/2012
Subject: News Release: Statements on EPA’s Proposed Carbon Pollution Standard for New Power PlantsCONTACT:Cathy Milbourn (News Media Only)
Milbourn.cathy@epa.gov
202-564-7849
202-564-4355

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
March 27, 2012

Statements on EPA’s Proposed Carbon Pollution Standard for New Power Plants
WASHINGTON -- Following a 2007 Supreme Court ruling, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today proposed the first Clean Air Act standard for carbon pollution from new power plants. EPA’s proposed standard reflects the ongoing trend in the power sector to build cleaner plants that take advantage of American-made technologies, including new, clean-burning, efficient natural gas generation, which is already the technology of choice for new and planned power plants. At the same time, the rule creates a path forward for new technologies to be deployed at future facilities that will allow companies to burn coal, while emitting less carbon pollution. The rulemaking proposed today only concerns new generating units that will be built in the future, and does not apply to existing units already operating or units that will start construction over the next 12 months. Here’s what people across the country are saying about EPA’s proposed carbon pollution standard for new power plants:

John Arensmeyer, CEO, Small Business Majority:
“…National opinion polling we released in September found 76 percent of small business owners support the EPA regulating carbon emissions under the Clean Air Act. Another 87 percent believe improving innovation and energy efficiency are good ways to increase prosperity for small businesses…”

Albert A. Rizzo, M.D., Chair, Board of Directors of the American Lung Association: “…By proposing standards for carbon pollution from new facilities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is setting the stage for the next generation of America’s power plants to be the least toxic and most modern in the world…”

The Clean Energy Group’s Clean Air Policy Initiative:“…EPA’s action today represents a modest step that provides the industry with business and regulatory certainty… Further, based on our review of recent projections by the U.S. Energy Information Administration and current market dynamics, the proposed GHG performance standards for new sources will not impact the reliability of the electric system.”

Mindy S. Lubber, president of Ceres and director of the Investor Network on Climate Risk:“Ceres applauds the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for releasing, for public comment, its historic proposal to limit carbon pollution from new power plants under the Clean Air Act. Ceres supports this new standard because it will provide certainty to businesses and investors, clarify the risks and opportunities for the U.S. electric power sector, and serve as a long-term market signal to drive greater investment in lower-carbon electric power generation…”

Dick Munson, SVP, Recycled Energy Development:“The Environmental Protection Agency’s new rules on greenhouse-gas emissions will help U.S. businesses increase their productivity and competitiveness. By internalizing the costs of pollution, EPA has provided certainty to firms seeking to generate clean energy and increase manufacturing efficiency.”

Ralph Izzo, CEO, Public Service Electric and Gas:
“…The Agency’s action establishes a logical and modest standard for new electric power plants and provides the industry with much-needed regulatory certainty. The EPA provides a framework for the industry to confront this problem in a cost effective manner…”  

Sen. Tom Carper (D-Del.), Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Safety:“...Today’s proposal to ensure that new coal and natural gas power plants take into account their greenhouse gas emissions before they commence construction is a step in the right direction as we work to curb these harmful emissions...”

Bill Ritter Jr., Former Colorado Governor:“…It is welcome news, indeed, to see our nation moving forward with clean air standards to limit the harmful carbon pollution from new coal burning power plants as coal plants are the highest emitting source of air pollution in our country.  The proposed emission standards for carbon pollution will unleash smart investments in cleaner, homegrown energy that will limit dangerous pollution and build a modern clean energy economy for the 21st Century.”

Senator Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.):“The EPA took an important step today in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions with the release of the New Source Performance Standards…”

Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D- Calif.), Ranking Member, Committee on Energy and Commerce: “The proposal is a breakthrough. It sets achievable limits on dangerous carbon pollution, spurs investments in new clean energy technologies, and provides certainty for industry. And it shows the President is listening to scientists, not extremists who deny the existence of climate change. Today’s action will reduce pollution, make families healthier, promote innovation, and help us compete with China and other countries that are investing in clean energy.”

Rep. Ed Markey (D-Mass.), Ranking Member, Committee on Natural Resources:“…The Obama administration has already put us on the path towards emitting less pollution from our vehicle tailpipes, and now they are doing the same thing for America’s power plant smokestacks. Both efforts will spur a generation of American-built energy innovation, and help stave off the worse effects of climate change. This carbon standard is yet another indication that we need to keep America’s natural gas here at home to provide affordable electricity and capitalize on this competitive advantage to rebuild our manufacturing, chemical and fertilizer industries.”

American Sustainable Business Council, Environmental Entrepreneurs (E2) and Main Street Alliance:“…As representatives of the business community, we understand the importance of certainty and clear market signals and believe a national standard to reduce carbon pollution from new power plants will both clarify risks and opportunities for U.S. businesses, while also leading to technological innovation and investment in the domestic clean energy market.  Investing in cleaner technologies and more efficient resources can be a pathway to profit and prosperity, boosting economic growth and creating jobs while also providing competitive returns to investors.  We look forward to reviewing the proposal and identifying opportunities for increased investment in innovative low and no-carbon technologies as well as new energy infrastructure and energy efficiency…”

R046

Global Warming & Climate Change Myths Skeptical Science

Global Warming & Climate Change Myths Skeptical Science