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Saturday, December 8, 2012

ENENews Update 12/08

ENENews.com - Energy News



Posted: 07 Dec 2012 06:47 PM PST
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Deadlock In Doha: Is Qatar Going To Be The Place Where International Agreements Go To Die?

Posted: 07 Dec 2012 12:17 PM PST
by Rebecca Lefton and Andrew Light: This year’s UN climate negotiations have once again deadlocked. Negotiators and observers in the hall are concerned that this meeting could end with no outcome, much like the long-stalled Doha trade negotiations. We’re tracking the major sticking points in the three tracks of the meeting and make recommendations on how to move forward. Those interested can tune in here, and look for which sessions are going on live in plenary room one or two.http://theenergycollective.com/josephromm/154291/deadlock-doha-qatar-going-be-place-where-international-agreements-go-die?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=The+Energy+Collective+%28all+posts%29

Doha: Climate Negotiators Fail to Meet the Scientific Challenge

Posted: 08 Dec 2012 12:43 AM PST
On the last day, talks at Doha aimed at securing a global agreement to tackle climate change are providing scant hope, although individual announcements from nations on the sidelines provide some progress. The central issue, as always, is fairness over who pays. The U.S. has a target of reducing emissions by 17% by 2020 compared to 2005 emissions. Its negotiators said that this is unlikely to change.http://theenergycollective.com/david-k-thorpe/154356/doha-climate-negotiators-fail-meet-scientific-challenge?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=The+Energy+Collective+%28all+posts%29

What Are the Near-Term Climate Pearl Harbors?

Posted: 08 Dec 2012 03:12 AM PST
One of the media’s greatest failings is ‘underinforming’ people that “Bad things are happening to real people right now thanks in part to human-caused climate change — droughts, wildfires, flooding, extreme weather, and on and on.” If you have the right hypothesis or worldview, you can make sense out of “noisy” warnings. If you don’t, then you will be oblivious even to signs that in retrospect will seem quite obvious.http://theenergycollective.com/josephromm/154286/what-are-near-term-climate-pearl-harbors-what-will-take-us-procrastination-action?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=The+Energy+Collective+%28all+posts%29

Friday, December 7, 2012

Greenland ice sheet carries evidence of increased atmospheric acidity

Greenland ice sheet carries evidence of increased atmospheric acidity
(Phys.org)—Research has shown a decrease in levels of the isotope nitrogen-15 in core samples from Greenland ice starting around the time of the Industrial Revolution. The decrease has been attributed to a corresponding increase in nitrates associated with the burning of fossil fuels. http://phys.org/news/2012-12-greenland-ice-sheet-evidence-atmospheric.html#nwlt

How A Progressive Carbon Tax Will Fight Climate Change And Stimulate The Economy

How A Progressive Carbon Tax Will Fight Climate Change And Stimulate The Economy

Europe's Carbon Trading Problems May Influence U.S. Climate Policy

Europe's Carbon Trading Problems May Influence U.S. Climate Policy

A flooded carbon market could help make the case for carbon taxation in the United States.
Europe’s carbon trading market is stuttering, and its problems could help guide attempts to curb carbon emissions in many other countries.http://www.technologyreview.com/news/507896/europes-carbon-trading-problems-may-influence-us-climate-policy/

ENENews.com Energy News 12/07

ENENews.com - Energy News



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Thursday, December 6, 2012

Shell's Arctic Plans on Hold once more after Containment Dome Fails Tests

Shell's Arctic Plans on Hold once more after Containment Dome Fails Tests

After struggling to get the last of their drilling equipment out of the Beaufort Sea as winter sea ice encroached, it appeared the long list of criticisms and setbacks that marked Shell’s first Arctic Ocean drilling season had come to an end.That respite was very brief.Seattle’s NPR affiliate KUOW has released internal emails between Interior Department officials, obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, detailing Shell’s failed test of underwater oil spill response equipment. Shell and the federal government kept a close…Read more...http://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Shells-Arctic-Plans-on-Hold-once-more-after-Containment-Dome-Fails-Tests.html

Environmentalists Must Make Up their Minds about Renewable Energy

Environmentalists Must Make Up their Minds about Renewable Energy

Environmentalists are united in the common belief that the world must phase out fossil fuels and develop the majority of its energy from renewable sources.Unfortunately renewable energy is still in its relative infancy and as such cannot compete on a price per kilowatt basis with traditional carbon-based fossil fuels such as oil, natural gas, and coal. This leaves options limited and is preventing a full scale migration to renewable energy.You would think that environmentalists, understanding the limitations that still face widespread renewable…Read more...http://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Environmentalists-Must-Make-Up-their-Minds-about-Renewable-Energy.html

U.S. LNG Export Industry to be Worth $47 Billion a Year by 2020

U.S. LNG Export Industry to be Worth $47 Billion a Year by 2020

A recent study carried out by NERA Economic Consulting on behalf of the US Energy Department has found that the economic benefits of exporting its cheap and abundant natural gas in the form of LNG far outweigh the negative potential of an increase in prices for domestic consumers.Already more than a dozen LNG projects have been proposed by various energy companies across the US, all planning to export to Europe and Asia where gas commands a far higher price, however the White House has always been very reluctant to approve any of these projects…Read more...http://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/U.S.-LNG-Export-Industry-to-be-Worth-47-Billion-a-Year-by-2020.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+oilpricecom+%28Oil+Price.com+Daily+News+Update%29

Should Environmentalists Just Say No to Eating Meat?

Should Environmentalists Just Say No to Eating Meat?

Conservation organizations are working with industry to try to make beef production more sustainable. But some are questioning whether green groups should be accepting funds from the beef industry or whether they should instead be urging consumers to stop eating meat. BY MARC GUNTHERhttp://e360.yale.edu/feature/should_environmentalists_just_say_no_to_eating_meat/2599/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+YaleEnvironment360+%28Yale+Environment+360%29

Google Images Document Devastation of 2011 Tsunami in Japan

Google Images Document Devastation of 2011 Tsunami in Japan

As part of an ongoing project to digitally archive the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami in northeastern Japan, Google has published several new panoramic images that provide a sobering glimpse of the widespread devastation in communities across the region. The images, taken with the company’s Street View technology in four cities in the Tōhoku region, allows users to take a virtual tour of seriously damaged buildings before they are demolished. One panoramic view of a public housing project illustrates the height of the tsunami wave, which ruined everything up to the fourth floor of the building. Another image, of the condemned Ukedo Elementary School, shows the collapsed auditorium floor beneath the banner of a graduation ceremony that was never held. The images were added to Google’s “Memories for the Future” website, which is chronicling the affected areas from before and after the tsunami.http://e360.yale.edu/digest/google_images_document_devastation_of_2011_tsunami_in_japan/3712/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+YaleEnvironment360+%28Yale+Environment+360%29

More Potent than CO2, N2O Levels in California May be Nearly Three Times Higher Than Previously Thought

More Potent than CO2, N2O Levels in California May be Nearly Three Times Higher Than Previously Thought

Berkeley CA (SPX) Dec 07, 2012
Using a new method for estimating greenhouse gases that combines atmospheric measurements with model predictions, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) researchers have found that the level of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas, in California may be 2.5 to 3 times greater than the current inventory. At that level, total N2O emissions-which are believed to come primarilyhttp://www.seeddaily.com/reports/More_Potent_than_CO2_N2O_Levels_in_California_May_be_Nearly_Three_Times_Higher_Than_Previously_Thought_999.html

World Bank Report Released: Adaptation to a Changing Climate in the Arab Countries

World Bank Report Released: Adaptation to a Changing Climate in the Arab Countries

This week, the World Bank, a partnership established in 1944, that provides "financial and technical assistance to developing countries around the world" released a report titled, Adaptation to a Changing Climate in the Arab Countries (2012).  According to the press release, the 441-page report available here, discusses how,
extreme weather events are the new norm for the region. The consequences of the global phenomenon of climate change are especially acute in the Arab world. While the region has been adapting to changes in rainfall and temperature for thousands of years, the speed with which the climate is now changing has, in many cases, outstripped traditional coping mechanisms.
. . .
The report draws on extensive regional knowledge and expertise for a comprehensive analysis of the potential impact of climate change. Temperatures are projected to reach new highs, and in most places there will be less rainfall. Water availability will be reduced, and with a growing population, the already water-scarce region may not have sufficient supplies to irrigate crops, support industry, or provide drinking water.
This will put the livelihoods of men and women at potential risk from climate change. Each has different vulnerabilities largely based on their respective roles in society. Men in rural areas are likely to follow current trends of moving to cities to seek paid employment, as their traditional livelihoods become unsustainable. Rural women will face the double challenge of having to devote more time to daily activities, such as fetching scarce water, while assuming the farming and community responsibilities of the absent men.
. . .
Left unaddressed, these changes in the family structure have the potential of becoming significant sources of stress. Actions taken to help both men and women understand and adapt to these changes at the household level are an important part of the possible policy responses. Women especially, with their pivotal role in societies, can be a major influence on the attitudes and behavior needed to accommodate new forms of livelihood and social organization.

USGS Report Released: Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-gas Fluxes in Ecosystems of the Western United States

USGS Report Released: Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-gas Fluxes in Ecosystems of the Western United States

Recently, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released a report titled Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-gas Fluxes in Ecosystems of the Western United States (USGS Professional Paper 1787). The 40-page report available here, discusses the following:
This assessment was conducted to fulfill the requirements of section 712 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 and to improve understanding of carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes in ecosystems of the Western United States. The assessment examined carbon storage, carbon fluxes, and other GHG fluxes (methane and nitrous oxide) in all major terrestrial ecosystems (forests, grasslands/shrublands, agricultural lands, and wetlands) and aquatic ecosystems (rivers, streams, lakes, reservoirs, and coastal waters) in two time periods: baseline (generally in the first half of the 2010s) and future (projections from baseline to 2050). The assessment was based on measured and observed data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and many other agencies and organizations and used remote sensing, statistical methods, and simulation models.

USGS Report Released: Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-gas Fluxes in Ecosystems of the Western United States

USGS Report Released: Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-gas Fluxes in Ecosystems of the Western United States

Recently, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released a report titled Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-gas Fluxes in Ecosystems of the Western United States (USGS Professional Paper 1787). The 40-page report available here, discusses the following:
This assessment was conducted to fulfill the requirements of section 712 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 and to improve understanding of carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes in ecosystems of the Western United States. The assessment examined carbon storage, carbon fluxes, and other GHG fluxes (methane and nitrous oxide) in all major terrestrial ecosystems (forests, grasslands/shrublands, agricultural lands, and wetlands) and aquatic ecosystems (rivers, streams, lakes, reservoirs, and coastal waters) in two time periods: baseline (generally in the first half of the 2010s) and future (projections from baseline to 2050). The assessment was based on measured and observed data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and many other agencies and organizations and used remote sensing, statistical methods, and simulation models.

Posted: 06 Dec 2012 06:17 AM PST Climate Change Risk Looms as 2 Degree Limit Now Unlikely

http://theenergycollective.com/globalwarmingisreal/153056/climate-change-risk-looms-2-degree-limit-now-unlikely?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=The+Energy+Collective+%28all+posts%29

World's Largest Mining Company Admits Climate Change Is Real

http://theenergycollective.com/rosana-francescato/152826/worlds-largest-mining-company-admits-climate-change-real?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=The+Energy+Collective+%28all+posts%29

ENENews.com - Energy News 12/07

ENENews.com - Energy News



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Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Kyoto all Over Again? US Obstructive Force at Climate Talks


Kyoto all Over Again? US Obstructive Force at Climate Talks

Ban Ki Moon: Wealthy nations are to blame, should be first to step up

- Jacob Chamberlain, staff writer- http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2012/12/05-2

Arctic Report Card: Dark Times Ahead

Arctic Report Card: Dark Times Ahead

Decreasing snow amounts may be pushing Arctic fox populations in Europe toward extinction
NOAA
Conditions in the Arctic are slipping rapidly from bad to worse as the pace of climate change accelerates in that region. That’s the message from an annual environmental assessment of the far North, released on Wednesday.http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/reportcard/index.html

Securing Healthy Soils

Securing Healthy Soils

Princess Bajrakitiyabha
Her Royal Highness Princess Bajrakitiyabha of Thailand is her country's Ambassador to Austria and IAEA Governor. On
World Soil Day, Princess Bajrakitiyabha explains His Majesty King Bhumibol's lifelong commitment to preserving and protecting soil.
Soil is an indispensable part of our environment. Healthy, fertile soils are essential to secure food and clean water, to preserve biodiversity, and to mitigate climate change.
On World Soil Day, 5 December 2012, Her Royal Highness Princess Bajrakitiyabha of Thailand, discussed in this video interview His Majesty King Bhumibol's lifelong commitment to preserving and protecting soil.
World Soil Day is celebrated on His Majesty's birthday to honour his contribution to soil preservation. Princess Bajrakitiyabha, Ambassador to Austria and IAEA Governor, also discusses sustainable solutions to help prevent soil loss.
-- By Peter Kaiser, IAEA Division of Public Information

Saving Soil - Saving Livelihoods

Saving Soil - Saving Livelihoods

Plant
World Soil Day, an annual celebration to highlight the importance of soil to societies across the world and the need to use it sustainably, takes place on 5 December 2012. (Photo: L. Potterton/IAEA)
Soil is the basis for sustenance for 7 billion people. It preserves clean water and helps regulate the climate. Soil degradation reduces agricultural yields and threatens farmers' livelihoods. Soil that has been leached of its nutrients cannot support crops, or plants that prevent desertification. Healthy soil is essential to ensure a steady supply of food and biodiversity. Soil loss translates into widespread poverty and slower economic development. Yet this indispensable natural resource can be overlooked when policy-makers seek solutions to combat poverty and improve livelihoods. Held every year on 5 December, World Soil Day commemorates the importance of soil for our survival and the need to use it sustainably.
Poor agricultural practices have contributed very heavily to the degradation of cropland worldwide - by 1990, about 38 per cent of all arable land had already been lost. An additional 5 to 6 million hectares of arable land continues to be lost each year. In the past 22 years, this has amounted to an area over twice as large as Germany. One third of the global population lives in drought-prone areas, where climate conditions further amplify land loss problems.
With improved soil management practices, however, soil can be protected and even regenerated. Properly managed soil will hold more rainwater, increasing crop yields and lessening the risk of erosion and polluted run-off that threaten fresh water supplies. To track the movement of water and nutrients through soil, nuclear techniques are invaluable. The movement of isotopes - variants of a chemical element - can be tracked in soils, crops, waters, fertilisers and animal manure to follow the path of water through soil, measure soil erosion, and quantify nutrient and water use by crops.
"In order to combat poverty, improve food security and preserve biodiversity, the IAEA's scientific research and nuclear techniques need to be included in soil and water policies in developing countries. The results need to reach our Member States," says Susanne Nebel, an IAEA expert in building partnerships for the IAEA's Technical Cooperation programme. Policy makers, governments and scientists need to join forces to address effective soil management.
For example, the IAEA has undertaken soil erosion analysis in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan that has provided important evidence-based data to support changes to these countries' soil legislation.
The Pamir and Pamir-Alai Mountains in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan are one of Central Asia's most significant reservoirs of biodiversity. The wide variety of animals, plants and the purity of the fresh water are unique. However, in the past decades, land degradation has reduced biodiversity, polluted water reserves and impoverished farmers. The governments of both countries understood that they shared problems and started the "Sustainable Land Management in the High Pamir and Pamir-Alai Mountains" initiative, or PALM. This trans-boundary initiative tackles land degradation and poverty simultaneously. This integrative project is led by the United Nations University and the World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies (WOCAT), supported by many specialized agencies, including the IAEA.
The IAEA helped national scientists by taking samples, setting up a laboratory and interpreting data. Alongside the IAEA, national experts assessed the isotopic composition of the soil and determined soil erosion quantities. They could prove that the root causes of soil erosion were inappropriate agricultural practices and irrigation techniques. These practices and techniques could be adapted to reduce soil loss and support sustainable agricultural practices. The project also provided the scientific data needed to support sustainable land use planning and to promote soil and water conservation techniques.
Erosion was reduced by a factor of ten when the new science-based land-use plans were introduced. The amount of soil lost through erosion dropped from 150 tonnes per hectare to less than 15 tonnes per hectare. Using new irrigation methods, the soil could also retain more nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, sulphur and potassium, increasing its fertility.
The IAEA's work in soil achieves the greatest impact through strong partnerships between international organizations, according to Nebel, "The IAEA has the scientific expertise. Other organizations can help Member States translate the scientific results into policy." Nebel sees potential for future collaboration in the new Global Soil Partnership that brings together international, regional and national organizations, working in the area of soil protection and sustainable management. "Getting research results out of the lab and into the national soil and water action plans is part of our effort towards a more meaningful technical cooperation programme in soil and water management," she concluded.
-- By Iulia Iliut, IAEA Division of Public Information

Carbon dioxide could reduce crop yields

Carbon dioxide could reduce crop yields

Dortmund, Germany (SPX) Dec 06, 2012
The carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere continues to climb and heat up the climate. The gas is, however, indispensable for plants, as they use the carbon it provides to form glucose and other important substances. Therefore, the more carbon dioxide the better? The equation is unfortunately not as simple as that. The plants, which ensure our basic food supply today, have not been bred forhttp://www.seeddaily.com/reports/Carbon_dioxide_could_reduce_crop_yields_999.html

Clearest evidence yet of polar ice losses

Clearest evidence yet of polar ice losses

Paris (ESA) Dec 06, 2012
After two decades of satellite observations, an international team of experts brought together by ESA and NASA has produced the most accurate assessment of ice losses from Antarctica and Greenland to date. This study finds that the combined rate of ice sheet melting is increasing. The new research shows that melting of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets has added 11.1 mm to global sea levelshttp://www.terradaily.com/reports/Clearest_evidence_yet_of_polar_ice_losses_999.html

AP Interview: UN chief blames rich for warming

AP Interview: UN chief blames rich for warming
(AP)—Rich countries are to blame for climate change and should take the lead in forging a global climate pact by 2015, a deadline that "must be met," the head of the United Nations said Wednesday. http://phys.org/news/2012-12-ap-chief-blames-rich.html#nwlt

World Bank: Arab World hit hard by climate change

World Bank: Arab World hit hard by climate change
(AP)—The Middle East and North Africa will be especially hard hit by climate change in the coming decades, the World Bank said in a report Wednesday, saying the region will see less rainfall, more recording-breaking temperatures and rising sea levels. http://phys.org/news/2012-12-world-bank-arab-hard-climate.html#nwlt

NRDC Report Released: Closing the Power Plant Carbon Pollution Loophole: Smart Ways the Clean Air Act Can Clean Up America’s Biggest Climate Polluters

NRDC Report Released: Closing the Power Plant Carbon Pollution Loophole: Smart Ways the Clean Air Act Can Clean Up America’s Biggest Climate Polluters

This month, the Natural Resources Defence Council (NRDC), an international non-profit environmental advocacy and action group which focuses on the protection of wildlife and habitat issues a report titled, Closing the Power Plant Carbon Pollution Loophole: Smart Ways the Clean Air Act Can Clean Up America’s Biggest Climate Polluters (R: 12-11-A). According to the press release for the 90-page report available here,
 
NRDC’s innovative proposal calls for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to use its authority under the Clean Air Act to set standards for existing power plants—America’s largest source of carbon emissions that fuel climate change—that will cut millions of tons of carbon pollution, save thousands of lives and create thousands of clean energy jobs.
The proposal enables states and electricity plant owners to use a wide range of existing technologies, including energy efficiency and renewable energy sources, to meet carbon pollution standards in the most cost-effective way. States would also have broad flexibility to design their own plans to meet the standards.
 . . .
Under NRDC’s proposal, the EPA would use Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act to set state-specific carbon emission rates that reflect the diversity of the nation’s electricity sector and fuel mix. Broad compliance flexibility would enable power plant owners and states to reduce emissions through cost-effective means that could be accomplished by:
  • Reducing an individual plant’s carbon emissions by improving combustion efficiency, burning cleaner fuels or installing carbon capture and storage.
  • Shifting generation from high-emitting to lower- or zero-emitting plants. Lower emitting sources such as gas, wind and solar would earn credits that other plants could use, to reduce average emissions rates.
  • Expanding energy efficiency. State energy-efficiency programs could earn credits for avoiding power generation and its pollution. Generators could purchase those credits to use toward their emissions targets.
  • States would have additional freedom to adopt alternative approaches–such as those already adopted by California, the Northeast states, and Colorado—as long as they are equally effective in cutting emissions.

National Academies Report Released: Disaster Resilience: A National Imperative

National Academies Report Released: Disaster Resilience: A National Imperative

Recently, the National Academies Press (NAP) released a report produced by the Committee on Increasing National Resilience to Hazards and Disasters; Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy; and the The National Academies titled, Disaster Resilience: A National Imperative (2012). The 244-page report is available free with a one-time registration. According to the abstract,
No person or place is immune from disasters or disaster-related losses. Infectious disease outbreaks, acts of terrorism, social unrest, or financial disasters in addition to natural hazards can all lead to large-scale consequences for the nation and its communities. Communities and the nation thus face difficult fiscal, social, cultural, and environmental choices about the best ways to ensure basic security and quality of life against hazards, deliberate attacks, and disasters. Beyond the unquantifiable costs of injury and loss of life from disasters, statistics for 2011 alone indicate economic damages from natural disasters in the United States exceeded $55 billion, with 14 events costing more than a billion dollars in damages each.
One way to reduce the impacts of disasters on the nation and its communities is to invest in enhancing resilience--the ability to prepare and plan for, absorb, recover from and more successfully adapt to adverse events. Disaster Resilience: A National Imperative addresses the broad issue of increasing the nation's resilience to disasters. This book defines "national resilience", describes the state of knowledge about resilience to hazards and disasters, and frames the main issues related to increasing resilience in the United States. It also provide goals, baseline conditions, or performance metrics for national resilience and outlines additional information, data, gaps, and/or obstacles that need to be addressed to increase the nation's resilience to disasters. Additionally, the book's authoring committee makes recommendations about the necessary approaches to elevate national resilience to disasters in the United States.
Enhanced resilience allows better anticipation of disasters and better planning to reduce disaster losses-rather than waiting for an event to occur and paying for it afterward. Disaster Resilience confronts the topic of how to increase the nation's resilience to disasters through a vision of the characteristics of a resilient nation in the year 2030. Increasing disaster resilience is an imperative that requires the collective will of the nation and its communities. Although disasters will continue to occur, actions that move the nation from reactive approaches to disasters to a proactive stance where communities actively engage in enhancing resilience will reduce many of the broad societal and economic burdens that disasters can cause.
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Carbon Capture & Storage: Time For Coordinated International Action?

Posted: 05 Dec 2012 06:20 AM PST
George Peridas, Scientist, Climate Center – San FranciscoA group of NGOs spanning different continents has just released a new report on Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS). (see press release here) The groups include Clean Air Task Force, the Climate Institute, E3G, NRDC, Pembina, WRI and ZERO. The report was presented at the UNFCCC summit in Doha, which is under way right now.http://theenergycollective.com/georgeperidas/152596/ngos-release-new-international-report-carbon-capture-storage?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=The+Energy+Collective+%28all+posts%29

The "Instability Ingredient" and Business Risk

Posted: 05 Dec 2012 06:23 AM PST
Businesses have always had to predict and manage risks. Those risks include the potential impact of extreme weather such as floods, storms and drought on a company's supply chain, power supply, and property.But now companies must find a way to factor in the "instability ingredient" -- climate change -- which is likely to make weather more unpredictable, extreme -- and costly -- in the future.http://theenergycollective.com/seidel/152476/instability-ingredient-and-business-risk?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=The+Energy+Collective+%28all+posts%29

EPA faces lawsuit over biofuel mandate

EPA faces lawsuit over biofuel mandate
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is being sued by the American Petroleum Institute over its biodiesel mandate.
Full Articlehttp://www.pennenergy.com/articles/pennenergy/2012/12/epa-faces-lawsuit-over-biofuel-mandate.html?cmpid=EnlDailyPetroDecember52012

ENENews - Energy News 12/06

ENENews.com - Energy News



Posted: 04 Dec 2012 09:56 PM PST
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Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Editor's Note

Dear Readers
I am on business travel on Wednesday to Washington D.C. I will resume posting
tomorrow evening.
Michele Kearney

U.S wildfire risk worsening, according to climate projections

U.S wildfire risk worsening, according to climate projections

Scientists have projected drier conditions likely will cause increased fire activity across the United States in coming decades. Other findings about U.S. wildfires, including their amount of carbon emissions and how the length and strength ohttp://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121204145918.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Ftop_news%2Ftop_environment+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Top+News+--+Top+Environment%29

Gulf oil spill: Oil-dispersing chemicals had little effect on oil surfacing, according to new study

Gulf oil spill: Oil-dispersing chemicals had little effect on oil surfacing, according to new study

A new study examined the effects of the use of unprecedented quantities of synthetic dispersants on the distribution of an oil mass in the water column. Scientists developed and tested models to show that the application of oil-dispersing chemicals had little effect on the oil surfacing in the Gulf of Mexico.http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121204145828.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Ftop_news%2Ftop_environment+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Top+News+--+Top+Environment%29

A Turning Point for Mountaintop Removal Coal?

A Turning Point for Mountaintop Removal Coal?

John McQuaid, Forbes

Forbes
I first wrote about mountaintop removal mining – the practice of blowing the tops off mountains to excavate coal - about four years ago, and the shock of the reporting is still with me. On one of my first visits to a mountaintop site in West Virginia, I stood on the edge of a vast area under excavation. A mountainside had been rendered like a side of beef. You could spy thin, darker layers of coal amid the thicker shale. Trucks crawled over the makeshift roads, carting boulders to dump in a nearby valley. Suddenly, a huge demolition blast went off; the earth shook under my feet. As a companion and I walked away, noxious-smelling yellow smoke enveloped us. In short: you can’t truly understand the total war-like devastation that this does to mountains without...
Read Full Article ›› http://www.realclearenergy.org/2012/12/04/a_turning_point_for_mountaintop_removal_coal_250398.html

Finally, a Victory Against Mountaintop Removal

Finally, a Victory Against Mountaintop Removal

The first crack in a firewall that has protected big coal for decades.http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/coal/2012/11/legal_case_against_mountaintop_removal_mining_big_coal_finally_pays_for.single.html

USGS warns of connection between fracking and quakes


USGS warns of connection between fracking and...
The Mercury
The increasingly common practice of disposing of oil and gas drilling wastewater by injecting it underground can trigger earthquakes, according to federal scientists who studied quakes since 1970 in Colorado and neighboring states. Colorado authorities ...http://www.pottsmerc.com/article/20121204/NEWS04/121209789/usgs-warns-of-connection-between-fracking-and-earthquakes