Search This Blog

Saturday, June 8, 2013

Friday, June 7, 2013

Protecting our Oceans Togeher

Protecting Our Oceans Together

Durban, South Africa
According to UN Habitat, Durban is one of several African coastal cities that will be confronted with the adverse effects of rising sea levels. (Photo: iStockphoto)
"Together we have the power to protect the ocean". That is the motto of World Oceans Day 2013. Coupled with that vision is the certainty that our prosperity and development depend upon healthy oceans.
About 40 to 50 percent of the world's population live within 200 km of a coastline. That proximity is just one example of the oceans' importance in our lives. Global trade, energy, and food security are the most visible "services" the oceans provide daily. Yet, our survival depends on the ocean's "invisible" services like oxygen production (providing 50-80% of global oxygen supply), carbon sequestration (capturing 25% of man-made CO2 emissions), and climate regulation (transferring 50% of global heat).
Similar to a living being, the oceans perform and provide their services most efficiently when healthy. The IAEA in collaboration with other international partners seeks to help Member States monitor, evaluate, and find cost-effective, sustainable solutions to the challenges confronting the health of our oceans.
The United Nations and other international bodies have identified critical pressures facing the oceans, all of which are caused or exacerbated by human activities:
  • Among global climate change effects are rising sea levels and warming waters. Coupled with ocean acidification, these pressures are deteriorating physical and biological conditions in the oceans.
  • Marine pollution is another major source of pressure on the oceans. Land-based activities account for 80% of marine pollution whose volume continues to increase.
  • Over-extraction and the unsustainable exploitation of marine resources result in an ever more damaging effect on marine environments and marine life. This impact is particularly disruptive when it occurs in combination with the destruction of habitats that are essential to many marine services.
  • In addition to the loss of healthy habitats, the introduction of invasive species through human activities reduces the populations of native species and instigates destructive ecological change.
The IAEA's Environment Laboratories are contributing to international efforts to protect the oceans by developing and using a range of nuclear and isotopic techniques to create a more precise understanding of the ocean's degradation. Using radiotracers, IAEA scientists study biological processes to understand how marine organisms react to acidification and warming. Electron beams are used in breaking down pollutants, while isotopes are used to track their sources and dispersion.
Equally important to the research conducted is the role the IAEA plays in training researchers from developing countries. These scientists return to their home countries with new nuclear methods to help monitor these pressures. The precise knowledge derived from nuclear and isotopic techniques allows developing countries to make informed decisions to conserve the oceans and guide development to sustainably use ocean resources and services.
In September 2013, the IAEA will be hosting a Scientific Forum on our oceans, titled The Blue Planet - Nuclear Applications for a Sustainable Marine Environment. The Forum will bring together scientists, experts and policy makers from different fields to initiate dialogue and build new partnerships and cooperation to protect and preserve the ecological balance that is vital for the survival of the coastal regions and marine environment.

-- By Michael Madsen, IAEA Division of Public Information

It's Not Just Monsanto's Genetically Engineered Wheat: You May Already Be Eating Rogue GE Crops

Can humans control and contain genetically engineered crops? The answer appears to be no. Of the four major crops grown in the U.S., genetically engineered (GE) seeds are available for three: corn, soybeans and alfalfa. But a farmer growing the fourth major crop, wheat, could not (legally) plant GE seeds even if he wanted to. The biotech giant Monsanto did develop a variety of GE wheat years ag
1K by Jill Richardson, Alter... / 1d http://www.alternet.org/food/more-rogue-ge-crops-monsantos-

After Fukushima, Nuclear Power on Collision Course With Japanese Public

After Fukushima, Nuclear Power on Collision Course With Japanese Public

In the face of overwhelming public opposition, Japan's prime minister recently announced that nuclear power plants will restart.

http://www.alternet.org/story/156431/after_fukushima%2C_nuclear_power_on_collision_course_with_japanese_public

Get Used to the American West in Flames: What Living With the 'New Normal' Will Mean


Get Used to the American West in Flames: What Living With the 'New Normal' Will Mean

More than scenery is at stake, more even than the stability of soils, ecosystems, and watersheds. Here's why.
http://www.alternet.org/story/156446/get_used_to_the_american_west_in_flames%3A_what_living_with_the_%27new_normal%27_will_mean

Nuclear war between India and Pakistan could blot out the sun, starving much of the human race [PDF] (climate.envsci.rutgers.edu)


http://www.reddit.com/r/collapse/comments/1fs995/nuclear_war_between_india_and_pakistan_could_blot/

The past and future of DNA by MARK LYNAS

The past and future of DNAhttp://www.marklynas.org/2013/06/the-past-and-future-of-dna/#more-1195

 

his book is divided into two sections, printed upside down and back to back. It is a neat little trick which I don’t think I’ve come across before. There’s a good reason too: one half of the book is about the past history of life – looking specifically at the evolutionary history of DNA – while the other half is about the future, and how humans are now changing the rules via synthetic biology and genetic engineering. So you turn the book over at a time according roughly to the present.

The only problem is reading in public, where you look like an idiot reading a book upside down. And I don’t know how it works on the Kindle version – I was kindly sent a hard copy by the author. Anyway, I’ll divide up this review also into two parts, to respect and follow the order of the book. The author Adam Rutherford by the way has very impressive credentials: he is both an evolutionary biologist and a geneticist, as well as being an editor at the prestigious scientific journal Nature. Visit his website for more.

 

New Bill to Revive Offshore Drilling

New Bill to Revive Offshore Drilling

The sun sets behind two under constructi
The Offshore Energy and Jobs Act introduces reforms to revive offshore drilling, including a new five-year leasing plan aimed to expand drilling in the Atlantic and Pacific coastal regions.  On May 30, 2013, House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Doc Hastings (R-Wash.) introduced a bill to expand offshore drilling to the Atlantic and Pacific coasts by… Keep reading →http://breakingenergy.com/2013/06/06/new-bill-to-revive-offshore-drilling/?utm_source=Breaking+Energy&utm_campaign=49307db64f-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f852427a4b-49307db64f-407304281

Thursday, June 6, 2013

NASA sees heavy rainfall in tropical storm Andrea

NASA sees heavy rainfall in tropical storm Andrea
NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Tropical Storm Andrea right after it was named, while NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of the storm's reach hours beforehand. TRMM measures rainfall from space and saw that rainfall rates in the southern part of the storm was falling at almost 5 inches per hour. http://phys.org/news/2013-06-nasa-heavy-rainfall-tropical-storm.html#nwlt

Major study assesses sea level changes due to ice sheet losses

Major study assesses sea level changes due to ice sheet losses
(Phys.org) —Improved satellite measurements and computer simulations of ice sheets are creating a more accurate picture of the current and future rise in global sea level, according to an international team of climate experts including Slawek Tulaczyk, a professor of Earth and planetary sciences at UC Santa Cruz. http://phys.org/news/2013-06-major-sea-due-ice-sheet.html#nwlt

Center for Biological Diversity: Landmark Lawsuit Re-filed Against EPA to Protect Dozens of Endangered Species From Pesticides

Center for Biological Diversity: Landmark Lawsuit Re-filed Against EPA to Protect Dozens of Endangered Species From Pesticides
http://www.commondreams.org/newswire/2013/06/06-9

US PIRG: Senate Farm Bill Would Continue Giant Giveaways to Big Agribusiness

US PIRG: Senate Farm Bill Would Continue Giant Giveaways to Big Agribusiness
http://www.commondreams.org/newswire/2013/06/06-8

Scientists Find Holes in Monsanto GM Wheat Denial

Scientists Find Holes in Monsanto GM Wheat Denial
http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2013/06/06-1

US declares potential emergency over new Middle East virus

US declares potential emergency over new Middle East virus

http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/06/05/18778471-us-declares-potential-emergency-over-new-middle-east-virus?lite
Enhanced by Zemanta

Spike in whale deaths off Argentina's Patagonia: NGO

Spike in whale deaths off Argentina's Patagonia: NGO
Buenos Aires (AFP) June 4, 2013 - Southern right whales are dying off at a record rate in Argentina's Patagonia region, a conservation group warned Tuesday. "In the year 2012, there were 116 whale deaths reported, including 113 whale calves," the Buenos Aires-based Whale Conservation Institute ICB said, adding that it was nearly double the 61 whale deaths it recorded in 2011. The 2012 deaths represent about three percent ... morehttp://www.terradaily.com/reports/Spike_in_whale_deaths_off_Argentinas_Patagonia_NGO_999.html

Turning point for early human diets occurred 3.5 million years ago

Turning point for early human diets occurred 3.5 million years ago
San Francisco CA (SPX) Jun 06, 2013 - The old saying "You are what you eat" takes on new significance in the most comprehensive analysis to date of early human teeth from Africa. Prior to about 3.5 million years ago, early humans dined almost exclusively on leaves and fruits from trees, shrubs, and herbs-similar to modern-day gorillas and chimpanzees. However, about 3.5 million years ago, early human species like Australopithecus af ... morehttp://www.terradaily.com/reports/Turning_point_for_early_human_diets_occurred_3_point_5_million_years_ago_999.html

Researchers document acceleration of ocean denitrification during deglaciation


Researchers document acceleration of ocean denitrification during deglaciation
Corvallis OR (SPX) Jun 06, 2013 - As ice sheets melted during the deglaciation of the last ice age and global oceans warmed, oceanic oxygen levels decreased and "denitrification" accelerated by 30 to 120 percent, a new international study shows, creating oxygen-poor marine regions and throwing the oceanic nitrogen cycle off balance. By the end of the deglaciation, however, the oceans had adjusted to their new warmer state ... morehttp://www.terradaily.com/reports/Researchers_document_acceleration_of_ocean_denitrification_during_deglaciation_999.html

Acidifying oceans could spell trouble for squid


Acidifying oceans could spell trouble for squid
Cape Cod MA (SPX) Jun 06, 2013 - Acidifying oceans could dramatically impact the world's squid species, according to a new study led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) researchers and soon to be published in the journal PLOS ONE. Because squid are both ecologically and commercially important, that impact may have far-reaching effects on the ocean environment and coastal economies, the researchers report. "Squi ... morehttp://www.terradaily.com/reports/Acidifying_oceans_could_spell_trouble_for_squid_999.html

USDA Gives OK for 1500 Acre GM Wheat Trial



USDA Gives OK for 1500 Acre GM Wheat Trial
http://www.darkgovernment.com/news/usda-gives-ok-for-1500-acre-gm-wheat-trial/

In the wake of a discovery of Monsanto’s unapproved genetically engineered
wheat springing up in Eastern Oregon, the question has been asked – how did
this happen?

Monsanto’s answer is, as expected:
“We’re committed to being transparent about our investigation and sharing
information as it is assembled,” said Claire Cajacob, Monsanto’s wheat
research lead. “We’re prepared to provide [...]

Editor's Note

Hitting the I-95 Corridor from Boston to DC. Hope to make it into DC before the
rain. Later.
The Snuff

Experts Explain Effects of Radioactive Water at Fukushima

Experts Explain Effects of Radioactive Water at Fukushima


http://akiomatsumura.com/2013/06/experts-explain-effects-of-radioactive-water-at-fukushima.html

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Editor's Note

Dear Readers
I am on travel Thursday to attend graduation ceremonies in Washington D.C. this weekend.
Posting will be delayed but will try to catch up at the end of each day. Here is hoping that it
won't be too hot or humid, not to mention rainy when I get there.
Best regards.
Michele Kearney

NRA releases images of debris in

NRA releases images of debris inside Fukushima reactor building
Asahi Shimbun
Experts believe that the condensers failed, contributing to a meltdown at the No. 1 reactor taking place earlier than expected. The melting of fuel rods in the reactor began several hours after the quake and tsunami. The Diet's Fukushima Nuclear ...http://ajw.asahi.com/article/0311disaster/fukushima/AJ201306050085

NRA releases images of debris inside Fukushima reactor building

NRA releases images of debris inside Fukushima reactor building
Asahi Shimbun
Experts believe that the condensers failed, contributing to a meltdown at the No. 1 reactor taking place earlier than expected. The melting of fuel rods in the reactor began several hours after the quake and tsunami. The Diet's Fukushima Nuclear ...http://ajw.asahi.com/article/0311disaster/fukushima/AJ201306050085

TEPCO's failure at math may have increased radiation release at Fukushima plant

 

TEPCO's failure at math may have increased radiation release at Fukushima plant

http://ajw.asahi.com/article/0311disaster/fukushima/AJ201306050089

The climatic consequences of nuclear war

The climatic consequences of nuclear war

Article Highlights

  • Nuclear war of any kind would devastate the Earth's environment and cause incredible cooling in surface temperatures.
  • Yet these climatic consequences are never considered by the nuclear weapon states when they are formulating their nuclear doctrines.
  • To change this dynamic, the scientific community should pressure countries such as the United States and Russia to better consider the catastrophic potential of their nuclear arsenals.

http://www.thebulletin.org/web-edition/op-eds/the-climatic-consequences-of-nuclear-war

Hotter Planet Creating 'Extraordinary' Wild Fires says Head of US Forest Service

Hotter Planet Creating 'Extraordinary' Wild Fires says Head of US Forest Service
http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2013/06/05-4

The Green Nuclear Conversion

The Green Nuclear Conversion

Kamakura, Japan—Chances are pretty high, based on prevailing public opinion, that you will think my wife and I are a tad crazy, maybe even guilty of child abuse. During the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, which is a couple hundred miles from where we live, we stayed put while thousands of others fled the Tokyo area and many foreigners left Japan for good. Not only that, we buy as much of our fruits and vegetables as possible from Fukushima Prefecture, the Connecticut-size jurisdiction where the plant is located (we even specially order boxes of Fukushima produce) while millions of others in Japan take extreme care to consume only food from the far west and south of the country. And yes, our whole family, including our 12- and 10-year-old sons, eats Fukushima food. We’re convinced it’s perfectly safe, and we like helping people whose products suffer from an unjust taint.http://thebreakthrough.org/index.php/programs/energy-and-climate/the-green-nuclear-conversion/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+thebreakthrough+%28The+Breakthrough+Institute+Full+Site+RSS%29

The ‘Social Cost Of Carbon’ Is Almost Double What The Government Previously Thought

The ‘Social Cost Of Carbon’ Is Almost Double What The Government Previously Thought

Obama admin to lease New England waters for offshore wind By John Upton

The Obama climate move that nobody noticed

The Obama climate move that nobody noticed

The Obama administration just made a fairly significant move on climate change, and it flew right under the radar.http://grist.org/climate-energy/the-obama-climate-move-that-nobody-noticed/?utm_source=syndication&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=feed

One meteorologist’s come-to-Jesus moment on climate change By Chris Mooney

GMOs Don't Pose Threat to Our Health

GMOs Don't Pose Threat to Our Health

Alex Berezow, US News & WR
Perhaps the most difficult thing about being a science journalist is combating and extinguishing malevolent myths, which always seem to spread faster and further than the actual truth. The largest falsehood currently in circulation is that GMOs represent a threat "“ to our health, to our environment and to our food supply. But nothing could be further from the truth.http://www.usnews.com/debate-club/should-consumers-be-worried-about-genetically-modified-food/the-pervasive-myth-that-gmos-pose-a-threat

Migration No Longer Best Strategy for Yellowstone Elk

Migration No Longer Best Strategy for Yellowstone Elk
Released: 6/5/2013 1:00:00 PM
Contact Information:
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
Office of Communications and Publishing
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr, MS 119
Reston, VA 20192
Paul  Laustsen (USGS) 1-click interview
Phone: 650-329-4046

Chad Baldwin (UW)
Phone: 307-766-2929



In partnership with: University of Wyoming
 
0
LARAMIE, Wyo. — Migratory elk are coming back from Yellowstone National Park with fewer calves due to drought and increased numbers of big predators – two landscape-level changes that are reducing the benefits of migration with broader implications for conservation of migratory animals, according to a new study published in the journal Ecology.
The new study by the Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit – a joint program involving U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Wyoming, and the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, describes a long-term decline in the number of calves produced annually by the Clarks Fork herd, a population of about 4000 elk whose migrants travel annually between winter ranges near Cody, Wyoming and summer ranges within Yellowstone National Park.  Migratory elk experienced a 19 percent depression in rates of pregnancy over the four years of the study and a 70 percent decline in calf production over 21 years of monitoring by the WGFD, while the elk that did not migrate, known as resident elk, in the same herd experienced high pregnancy and calf production and are expanding their numbers and range into private lands outside of the park.
"This is one of North America's wildest and best-protected landscapes, where elk and other ungulates still retain their long-distance seasonal migrations – and yet it is the migratory elk that are struggling while their resident counterparts thrive in the foothills," said Arthur Middleton, who led this work as a University of Wyoming doctoral student and is now a postdoctoral fellow at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.
A key finding of the study was that only 70 percent of migratory elk were pregnant, compared to 90 percent of residents – a rate more typical of Rocky Mountain elk. The study shows that the hotter and dryer summer conditions of the last two decades, coincident with the long-term drought widely affecting the West, has reduced the duration of the spring period when tender new grasses are available to elk. This makes it harder for female migratory elk to find the forage they need to both nurse a calf and breed. Though elk typically bear a calf every year, migratory elk that nursed a calf had only a 23 percent chance of becoming pregnant again in the following year.
Another likely cause of the declining calf numbers among migrants was predation. Migrants share their range with four times as many grizzly bears and wolves than resident elk, and both predators are well known to prey on young elk calves. Resident elk get a break from high levels of predation in part because when predators kill livestock on the resident range, they are often lethally removed by wildlife managers and ranchers.
"A lower pregnancy rate reduces the number of calves that are born in the first place, then predation seems to reduce the number of migratory calves that survive the first few months of life," said Matthew Kauffman a research wildlife biologist with the USGS and Assistant Professor at the University of Wyoming. Kauffman goes on to explain that resident elk numbers are growing in the foothills not because migrants are choosing to stay behind, but rather because irrigated fields and lower predator numbers are allowing residents to raise more calves to adulthood.
Globally, wildlife migration is a dwindling phenomenon. Research and management often focus on conspicuous barriers like fences, roads, and other kinds of development that can physically impede migration corridors. While those are important, this study suggests that even in a landscape as well-protected as the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, subtler changes in predator management and forage quality on the seasonal ranges of migratory animals will also play an important role. Migration is conventionally understood as a strategy to gain better forage quality while also reducing exposure to denning predators, but in this case, it seems those benefits are instead being realized by the residents.
The study's authors note that their work does not predict that migratory elk will disappear, but rather that there could be a long-term shift underway in the relative abundance of migratory versus resident elk in the system. The study also highlights the perils of characterizing Yellowstone wolf re-introduction as a "natural experiment." Other key factors have changed since wolves were re-introduced, including growth in grizzly bears numbers and recurrent long-term drought associated with reduced snowpack and hotter summers. The authors caution that such factors should be taken into account in the effort to understand ongoing ecological changes in Yellowstone.
Middleton also points out that this work highlights the complex challenges facing regional wildlife managers and other stakeholders as they continue to adapt to the reintroduction and recovery of large carnivores, and severe drought that some studies suggest is linked to longer-term climate change. "Most immediately, these trends have meant lost hunting opportunity in the backcountry areas frequented by migratory elk, and increasing crop damage and forage competition with domestic livestock in the frontcountry areas where resident elk are expanding," said Middleton.
This work was a collaboration among the USGS’s Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, the WGFD, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, with cooperation from YNP and other agencies.  Primary funders include the WGFD, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, the Wyoming Animal Damage Management Board, the Wyoming Governor’s Big Game License Coalition, and USGS, among others.
The study is featured in a Forum section of Ecology, with a series of commentaries from other ecologists who study wildlife migration and predator-prey interactions.
Funding from the USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center contributed to this study.

Where Trash Accumulates in the Deep Sea

Surprisingly large amounts of discarded trash end up in the ocean. Plastic bags, aluminum cans, and fishing debris not only clutter our beaches, but accumulate in open-ocean areas such as the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch." Now, new research shows that trash is also accumulating in the deep sea, particularly in Monterey Canyon.http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130605144328.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Ftop_news%2Ftop_environment+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Top+News+--+Top+Environment%29

Carbon emissions helping to make Earth greener

Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide is stimulating photosynthesis and boosting Earth's plant cover – but the long-term consequences remain unclearhttp://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21829204.400-carbon-emissions-helping-to-make-earth-greener.html?cmpid=RSS|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|online-news
Enhanced by Zemanta

Germany shelves 'fracking' draft law for now

Germany shelves 'fracking' draft law for now
Berlin (AFP) June 04, 2013 - German Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservatives on Tuesday dropped plans for a draft law on "fracking" for the time being amid concerns by some coalition allies about the oil and gas extraction technique, sources said. Conservative deputies decided at a meeting that no draft legislation on the process, which is the subject of fierce debate in Germany, would be presented before September 22 g ... morehttp://www.energy-daily.com/reports/Germany_shelves_fracking_draft_law_for_now_999.html
Enhanced by Zemanta

Climate change raises stakes on US ethanol policy

Climate change raises stakes on US ethanol policy
Houston TX (SPX) Jun 05, 2013 - If the climate continues to evolve as predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the United States stands little to no chance of satisfying its current biofuel goals, according to a new study by Rice University and the University of California at Davis. The study published online in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science and Technology suggests that in ... morehttp://www.biofueldaily.com/reports/Climate_change_raises_stakes_on_US_ethanol_policy_999.html

Agricultural innovation offers only path to feed Africa and the world

Agricultural innovation offers only path to feed Africa and the world
Boston MA (SPX) Jun 05, 2013 - The world can only meet its future food needs through innovation, including the use of agricultural biotechnology, a Harvard development specialist said Tuesday. Since their commercial debut in the mid-1990s, genetically-designed crops have added about $100 billion to world crop output, avoided massive pesticide use and greenhouse gas emissions, spared vast tracts of land and fed millions ... morehttp://www.seeddaily.com/reports/Agricultural_innovation_offers_only_path_to_feed_Africa_and_the_world_999.html

Investigators link poultry contamination on farm and at processing plant

Investigators link poultry contamination on farm and at processing plant
Athens GA (SPX) Jun 05, 2013 - Researchers at the University of Georgia, Athens, have identified a strong link between the prevalence and load of certain food-borne pathogens on poultry farms, and later downstream at the processing plant. They report their findings in a manuscript published ahead of print in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. "This study suggests that reducing foodborne pathogen loads o ... morehttp://www.seeddaily.com/reports/Investigators_link_poultry_contamination_on_farm_and_at_processing_plant_999.html

Forest, soil carbon important but does not offset fossil fuel emissions

Forest, soil carbon important but does not offset fossil fuel emissions
Brisbane, Australia (SPX) Jun 05, 2013 - Leading world climate change experts have thrown cold water on the idea that planting trees can offset carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels. Professor Brendan Mackey of Griffith University Climate Change Response Program is the lead author of an international study involving researchers from Australia and the U.K. Their findings are reported in "Untangling the confusion around land c ... morehttp://www.terradaily.com/reports/Forest_and_soil_carbon_is_important_but_does_not_offset_fossil_fuel_emissions_999.html

DOI announces first offshore wind power lease sale

DOI announces first offshore wind power lease sale


http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2013/06/doi-announces-first-offshore-wind-power-lease-sale.html

Climate change threatens extinction for 82 percent of California native fish

Climate change threatens extinction for 82 percent of California native fish
Davis CA (SPX) Jun 04, 2013 -
Salmon and other native freshwater fish in California will likely become extinct within the next century due to climate change if current trends continue, ceding their habitats to non-native fish, predicts a study by scientists from the Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California, Davis. The study, published online in May in the journal PLOS ONE, assessed how vulnerable e ... morehttp://www.terradaily.com/reports/Climate_change_threatens_extinction_for_82_percent_of_California_native_fish_999.html

Is enough being done to make drinking water safe

Is enough being done to make drinking water safe
London, UK (SPX) Jun 04, 2013 -
There is a lack of evidence regarding the effectiveness of technologies used to reduce arsenic contamination finds research in BioMed Central's open access journal Environmental Evidence. More studies assessing the technologies themselves and how they are used in the community are needed to ensure that people have access to safe, clean water. Arsenic is now recognised to be one of the worl ... morehttp://www.terradaily.com/reports/Is_enough_being_done_to_make_drinking_water_safe_999.html

Ten dead, thousands evacuated as floods sweep Europe


Ten dead, thousands evacuated as floods sweep Europe
Prague (AFP) June 03, 2013 -
Thousands were forced from their homes and at least 10 people were killed as floodwaters deluged swathes of Europe on Monday, including the historic centre of the Czech capital Prague. Shops and schools were shut and road and rail transport were disrupted across the Czech Republic, Austria and Germany following torrential rains. The flooding caused chaos at Prague Zoo where around 1,000 ... morehttp://www.terradaily.com/reports/Ten_dead_thousands_evacuated_as_floods_sweep_Europe_999.html

New Explanation for Slow Earthquakes on San Andreas




New Explanation for Slow Earthquakes on San Andreas
Cape Cod MA (SPX) Jun 05, 2013 -
New Zealand's geologic hazards agency reported this week an ongoing, "silent" earthquake that began in January is still going strong. Though it is releasing the energy equivalent of a 7.0 earthquake, New Zealanders can't feel it because its energy is being released over a long period of time, therefore slow, rather than a few short seconds. These so-called "slow slip events" are common at ... morehttp://www.terradaily.com/reports/New_Explanation_for_Slow_Earthquakes_on_San_Andreas_999.html

First Floating Wind Turbine In The U.S. Deploys In Maine

First Floating Wind Turbine In The U.S. Deploys In Maine


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/04/us-floating-wind-turbine-maine_n_3380208.html

NWS Norman, OK: El Reno Tornado may be widest tornado ever, rare anticyclonic tornado observed

NWS Norman, OK: El Reno Tornado may be widest tornado ever, rare anticyclonic tornado observed


http://www.mattnoyes.net/new_england_weather/2013/06/nws-norman-ok-el-reno-tornado-may-be-widest-tornado-ever-rare-anticyclonic-tornado-observed.html

Fracking Update 6/5

Ohio legislators trying to ban fracking water disposal into ...
Timesonline.com
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- They've had earthquakes. Thousands of gallons of illegally dumped fracking wastewater. An ordinance that allows the leasing of city-owned ...http://www.timesonline.com/news/energy/ohio-legislators-trying-to-ban-fracking-water-disposal-into-injection/article_e86cbed7-25b3-5388-9f61-3a0791fbb009.html
California's “Anti-Fracking Legislation” To Wait Another Year
CleanTechnica
The recent 5.7 quake which destroyed 14 homes in Oklahoma, associated with conventional oil drilling rather than fracking, is yet another reminder of the ...http://cleantechnica.com/2013/06/04/californias-anti-fracking-legislation-to-wait-another-year/

Plastic from Grass

Plastic from Grass

Engineers seek a cheaper biodegradable polymer.

http://www.technologyreview.com/demo/515486/plastic-from-grass/?utm_campaign=newsletters&utm_source=newsletter-daily-all&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20130605

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

Scientists find that Fukushima-derived radioactivity in seafood poses minimal health risk

Scientists find that Fukushima-derived radioactivity in seafood poses minimal health risk
(Phys.org) —In 2012, Nicholas Fisher a distinguished professor in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) at Stony Brook University and postdoctoral scholar Zosia Baumann, working with a colleague at Stanford University's Hopkins Marine Station, reported that they had detected radioactivity in Pacific bluefin tuna swimming off the California coast. The source of the radioactivity was Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi powerplants, which were damaged by the strong earthquake and subsequent tsunami on 11 March 2011 and released large quantities of radioactivity into the Pacific Ocean. The news prompted widespread media interest and speculation as to the possible risks to seafood consumers posed by the levels of radioactivity found in the tuna. http://phys.org/news/2013-06-scientists-fukushima-derived-radioactivity-seafood-poses.html#nwlt

The intensity of land use doubled in the 20th century

The intensity of land use doubled in the 20th century
The growth of green plants – which can be measured in terms of "net primary production", or NPP for short – provides the energetic foundation for all life on earth. The share of NPP appropriated by humans (HANPP) through agriculture and forestry, bioenergy production, and vegetation fires doubled over the course of the past century. Researchers at the Institute of Social Ecology at the AAU have shown that while land is used more efficiently, simultaneously, the intensity of land use has increased continuously. In a study published in PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences), researchers warn that an increased expansion of bioenergy use would drastically raise HANPP to over 40%. http://phys.org/news/2013-06-intensity-20th-century.html#nwlt

Monsanto Still Testing Genetically Modified Wheat in Two States

Monsanto Still Testing Genetically Modified Wheat in Two States
http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2013/06/04-9

Connecticut Becomes First State to Require GMO Labeling

Connecticut Becomes First State to Require GMO Labeling
http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2013/06/04-3

: Iran's Reactor Said Damaged by Quakes


Iran's Reactor Said Damaged by Quakes

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/apnewsbreak-irans-reactor-damaged-quakes-19321754#.Ua5cjpywWBN

Nuclear Energy and My Greenpeace Conundrum

Nuclear Energy and My Greenpeace Conundrum


http://theenergycollective.com/marcgunther/232571/my-greenpeace-conundrum

"Exxon Lied About Oil Pipeline Rupture, Documents Show"

"Exxon Lied About Oil Pipeline Rupture, Documents Show" -- According to newly released documents, Exxon Mobil-the world's most profitable corporation-knew that contamination from a tar sands crude oil spill in Arkansas this year was dangerous and yet, the company downplayed it anyway.
http://www.truthdig.com/eartotheground/item/exxon_lied_about_oil_pipeline_rupture_documents_show_20130603/

Climate Change and Keystone XL: The Numbers Behind the Debate

Posted: 04 Jun 2013 06:00 AM PDT
Estimates of the climate impact of the Keystone XL project differ by up to four orders of magnitude. Is Keystone XL “ground zero” in the effort to stave off climate disaster, or is it a sideshow with negligible impact on emissions?http://theenergycollective.com/jessejenkins/232591/climate-change-impacts-keystone-XL?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=The+Energy+Collective+%28all+posts%29

State ready to take action over leaking Hanford nuclear waste tank

State ready to take action over leaking Hanford nuclear waste tank


http://www.king5.com/news/investigators/State-wants-details-from-feds-on-plan-for-leaking-Hanford-tank-210015431.html

The Coming Death of Venice?

The Coming Death of Venice?

Anna Somers Cocks

Venice is being eaten up by damp. Every inch of sea level rise counts now, because the water has overtopped the impermeable stone bases of most buildings and is being absorbed into the porous bricks. The damp has reached the upper floors and is rusting through the iron tie rods that hold the houses together. An overarching body, with real power, is desperately needed to save the city.http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2013/jun/20/coming-death-venice/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=June+4+2013&utm_content=June+4+2013+CID_279e28ab5a357a416cc91e5c31f8a983&utm_source=Email%20marketing%20software&utm_term=The%20Coming%20Death%20of%20Venice

Pandora’s Promise: The Triumph of Hope over Fear in Nuclear Power?

Pandora’s Promise: The Triumph of Hope over Fear in Nuclear Power?

By David Biellohttp://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/2013/06/04/pandoras-promise-the-triumph-of-hope-over-fear-in-nuclear-power/

Japan and S. Korea Ban all U.S. Wheat Following GMO Discovery

Japan and S. Korea Ban all U.S. Wheat Following GMO Discovery
http://www.darkgovernment.com/news/japan-and-s-korea-ban-u-s-all-u-s-wheat-following-gmo-discovery/

U.S. Wheat Banned in Japan, South Korea After Discovery of Monsanto GMO

Japan and parts of South Korea have banned U.S. wheat imports after the
discovery of a genetically modified crop in Oregon. Testing has confirmed
the GMO wheat comes from the agri-giant Monsanto. The herbicide-resistant
strain was field-tested several years ago before protests helped force Monsanto
to withdraw [...]

TEPCO finds groundwater contaminated with radioactive cesium


TEPCO finds groundwater contaminated with radioactive cesium

http://english.kyodonews.jp/news/2013/06/228399.html
Enhanced by Zemanta